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John Ireland and Constance Mui

ethics, using the notion of reverent awe as articulated by contemporary philosopher Paul Woodruff. To be sure, admits Arvidson, in Sartre's world, reverent awe as an attitude constitutes yet another manifestation of bad faith consciousness, and he

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Edited by Ârash Aminian Tabrizi, Kate Kirkpatrick, and Marieke Mueller

fields within and beyond philosophy and literature. In her contribution, Juliette Simont reads the possibility of a deep Kantian filiation in certain of Sartre’s writings where ethics is concerned. She traces how Sartre initially shares some of Kant

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Deborah Evans

of its conflict-driven hate agenda. In the final analysis, it seeks the negation of otherness in all its forms: political, religious, cultural, civilisational and ideological. The use of Sartre’s posthumously published Notebooks for an Ethics

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P. Sven Arvidson

By showing how Sartrean consciousness can be reverent, this article makes a connection between Sartre's early work and virtue ethics. Virtue ethics is about human character and its moral formation. Practicing virtuous behavior can mean it becomes

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Contemporary “Structures” of Racism

A Sartrean Contribution to Resisting Racial Injustice

Justin I. Fugo

that ethics must go beyond individual interactions between two people, to address the social and political conditions surrounding them. This is a direct criticism of Kantian ethics, along with ideal theories of justice, which impose demands to act, as

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Nik Farrell Fox and Bryan Mukandi

the difference in emphasis and direction in the passage from Being and Nothingness to the Notebooks for an Ethics , but she doesn’t go on to consider the ‘Third Ethics’ of his later work, which is a shame, given Sartre’s concern with human

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John Ireland and Constance Mui

financial inequality it has imposed (to say nothing of the isolation and alienation it systematically induces), Schweikart argues for a “living Marxism” that not only draws upon Sartre’s existentialist ethics of freedom, but also incorporates theoretical

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John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

Mike Neary likewise admires while suggesting ‘Sartre would have regarded Rowlandson's book as counter-revolutionary’), and less obviously, Jonathan Webber's Rethinking Existentialism , which places ethics at the centre of existentialism properly

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Alienation and Affectivity

Beauvoir, Sartre and Levinas on the Ageing Body

Kathleen Lennon and Anthony Wilde

development of an embodied ethics, which will not be the focus of our concern here. But with this voice, Beauvoir recognises the ambiguousness of our subjectivity so that, alongside our capacity for transcendence, there are the ‘risks of finitude

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Matthew Eshleman

-denying, subjectivist account of “existentialism” is that it stands in a rather disingenuous tension with a pastiche of substantive theses about Sartre, meta-ethics, evolutionary theory, political theory, and economics. Many of these theses prove difficult to pin down