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Roads versus Rivers

Two Systems of Spatial Structuring in Northern Russia and Their Effects on Local Inhabitants

Kirill V. Istomin

This article discusses 1) how elements of natural versus built environment—particularly natural (rivers) versus built transportation facilities (roads and railroads)—differently structure the perception and representation of space and spatial

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Tatiana Vagramenko

number of missionaries from within the post-Soviet space as well as from different foreign countries began their activities in the Russian Arctic, making it a “battlefield” of different missionary principles and strategies. Since the mid-1990s, scholars

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Along the Lines of the Occupation

Playing at Diminished Reality in East Jerusalem

Fabio Cristiano and Emilio Distretti

spaces, politics, and narratives are assembled and reproduced in rarified ways, often in contrast to the complexities on the ground. Particularly in the context of disputed areas, overlaying a virtual world over a disputed space remains a problematic

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Fabian Frenzel

The role of space for social and political organization is of increasing interest in organizational research, but a lot of the work has focused empirically on business and workplace organization, or has addressed the questions arising in this

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Inside and Outside the law

Negotiated Being and Urban Jouissance in the Streets of Beirut

Ghassan Hage

Despite Beirut’s lack of shared public spaces and centralized urban planning, its serious environmental problems, and the recurring political violence that marks its history ( Hermez 2017 ), the city’s inhabitants of all classes, even if in

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Alterpolitics or alterotopies

A critique of nomadology with reference to West African Fulbe

Riccardo Ciavolella

This article offers a critique of how the anthropology of pastoral nomadic societies participates in the debate about alternative forms of political organization and emancipation. In the first part, I retrace the roots of the reciprocal and circular influence between anthropology and critical theory, focusing on Deleuze and Guattari's “nomadology” and their reliance on ethnographies of “primitive” and especially nomadic people. Attracted by the spatial autonomy and immanent forms of resistance of nomads, their work nourished the poststructuralist interpretation of power, which in turn influenced contemporary radical political anthropologists. In the second part, I reintroduce ethnographic evidence on pastoral nomads into the discussion. Relying on recent ethnographic evidence of the crisis of nomadism, especially in West Africa, I argue that we should be more prudent in considering interstitial spaces of freedom and resistances as strategies for structurally changing power and for emancipation.

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Tiffany Pollock

Fire dancers in Southern Thailand, almost exclusively young, intra-/international migrant men from rural Thailand and Myanmar, are paid to entertain tourists at nightly beach parties. An unacknowledged economy fueled largely by tips, fire dancing is fast becoming an iconic symbol of Thailand’s young backpacker tourism sector but is not considered an acceptable form of labor or a valued artistic practice, because tourist beach spaces are perceived as sites of immorality, excessive drinking, and sexuality. Male fire dancers, then, come to be known as young social deviants who do not belong in the national imaginary and thus must maneuver around a complex politics of belonging with vast differences in social and economic power. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this article examines how belonging is negotiated among Burmese fire dancers working in Thailand, and how experiences of belonging are shaped by spatialized gendered moralities and masculinities that operate within the fire dancing scene.

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Marie Puysségur

the lived body and its relationship with a shifting identity. They document the experiences of two teenage girls (French Marieme and British Mia, both 15 years of age) in the spatially and socially marginal spaces of a Parisian cité and an East

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Jewish Space Reloaded

An Introduction

Eszter B. Gantner and Jay (Koby) Oppenheim

In 1996 the historian Diana Pinto published her often since quoted and discussed article on ‘A New Jewish Identity for Post-1989 Europe’. She was one of the first Jewish intellectuals to reflect on the fall of the Iron Curtain and the resulting political changes and their possible consequences for Jewish communities in Europe. In her article, she introduced the term ‘Jewish space’ that motivates the focus of this issue, as well as the term ‘voluntarily Jewish’, which describes the construction of identity free of external prescription. Pinto situates Jewish space in the context of the Erinnerungspolitik European democracies engaged in during the 1980s, when Holocaust memorialisation began to assume an institutional form through the establishment of Jewish museums, research institutes and exhibitions.

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Mapping Time, Living Space

Comment and Reply

Stephan Feuchtwang and Susan Bayly

The Bad, Fear and Blame? Comment on Bayly’s Mapping Time, Living Space Stephan Feuchtwang

Reply Susan Bayly