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Local Laughter, Global Polemics

Understanding Charlie Hebdo

Jane Weston Vauclair

Charlie Hebdo became a global name following the tragic events of 7 January 2015 in Paris. Following this, two competing, somewhat reductive forms of commentary on Charlie Hebdo rapidly emerged in the global media. Could Charlie Hebdo effectively be sidelined as a case of egregiously irresponsible and offensive satire, even if the attacks per se were inexcusable? Or could its cartoonists instead be championed as martyrs to free speech, having proved to have a backbone of conviction and courage that had been lacking elsewhere in the media? This article argues that a dual set of tensions have come to the fore through Charlie's vertiginous global exposure. These are tensions between the local and the global, and between the ethics of conviction and the ethics of responsibility. It looks to highlight how Charlie Hebdo's contributors have been engaging with these tensions, both in the 'survivor's issue' of 14 January 2015 and in other spaces of commentary.

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Bill Marshall

The welcome attention paid to Quebec in this issue of European Comic Art immediately points to a cluster of intellectual questions concerning identity, territory and academic discipline(s). What need was there for grouping a corpus, and analysis of it, according to this category, and what meanings are implied in that selection? And what problems are evoked by the adjective ‘European’? These are familiar questions to all those Quebec specialists working in French (‘and Francophone’) Studies, as well as, in my case, Film Studies. On the one hand, Quebec culture in all its forms of expression possesses a relevance and richness, due to historical and spatial factors I shall outline below, but is largely off the radar of the disciplines and sub-disciplines it could enrich. This is no more true than in French Studies, where it is difficult, but also necessary, topical (witness the continuing debate, five years after the manifesto, around littérature-monde) and urgent, to challenge the hierarchy implied in the centre and periphery generated by ‘(and) Francophone’. The challenge is to place Quebec in an endlessly comparative relationship with other French-speaking cultures, with other Atlantic spaces, in order to break down the barriers implied in an often ghettoised ‘specialisation’. Here bande dessinée scholarship has an interesting advantage, in that, despite the phenomenal cultural weight of the art form within metropolitan French life, a decidedly non-metropolitan space, namely Belgium, offers a central position. The opportunity is there to emphasise lateral connections that bypass as well as include metropolitan France, hence the work here on Tintin in Quebec. To an extent, bande-dessinée-monde, to coin a phrase, is already a reality.

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Round and About the Bande Dessinée Québécoise

From Its Early Days to Chiendent

Christopher Rolfe

What follows is an attempt to contextualise the bandes dessinées produced in Quebec from their early beginnings in the late nineteenth century to their renewal and expansion during the years immediately following the Quiet Revolution. The intention, above all, is to give a sense of a changing intellectual, artistic and cultural landscape, and to situate the creators of comic strips within it. In fact, as will become evident, the history of Quebec's comic strips is closely linked to the history of the province and in many ways reflects it. (As we will see, the all-pervasive influence of the Catholic Church and the rise of Quebec nationalism can be traced in the development of the bande dessinée.) Necessarily, given the scope of the topic and the limited space available, the attempted coverage will be sketchy and incomplete. Moreover, it is only right to point out that its author is very much a novice in the field of the comic strip. Nevertheless, it is hoped that - to use an appropriate metaphor - a broader picture and different perspectives will emerge for those unfamiliar with the history of Quebec, and that new avenues of research will be prompted.

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Conditional Freedom

A Portrait of Young Men's Sense of Belonging to the Street in Maputo, Mozambique

Andrea Moreira

young men navigate the spaces of urban life in the context of economic and social exclusion is the focus of this article. It is centered on the experiences of a group of young men who spent their days in a marketplace in Maputo, the capital city of

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Introduction

Repatriation and Ritual, Repatriation as Ritual

Laura Peers, Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, and Jennifer Shannon

Repatriation—one of the most powerful but undertheorized processes within “museum worlds”—is often portrayed as a space of contestation: Indigenous versus Western, sacred versus secular, science versus religion, colonial control versus cultural

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Tracey Reimann-Dawe

see not only how the explorers negotiate their European identity in comparison to African otherness but also how they use their encounters to tentatively construct a specifically German identity as it asserts itself in colonial space. Their works

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Forum Introduction

Anthropological Boundaries at Work

Francisco Martínez

different angles on the academic demarcations influencing how anthropology is practiced in Europe. Four colleagues explore different ways of questioning the boundaries of our discipline, opening up spaces for remaking anthropology (what can be said and done

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Benjamin Fraser

’s specific rooms, spaces and dimensions. Their collaboration on an architectural addition to the house takes centre stage as the graphic novel reaches its final pages. Antonio had always hoped to build a pérgola toscana [a projecting roof in the Tuscan

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Alex Link

analysis of the results of drifting, or the dérive , through urban space: of wandering ‘to find the types of architecture one desire[s] unconsciously ’. Lettrist psychogeographers are ‘travelers in a labyrinth revealed by their wish to find it’, putting

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Nick Nguyen, Philippe Kaenel, Michael Kelly, Charles Forsdick, Rikke Platz Cortsen, Sylvain Rheault, Hugo Frey, and Mark Nixon

man wandering on an absurd journey at the edges of time and space. ‘→’ refers to the recurring sign that appears throughout the book and keeps the protagonist and the narrative moving forward. For practical reasons, the book needed a name, so Mathieu