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J. Gavin Paul, Caroline Rossiter, Ann Miller, and Mark McKinney

BOOK REVIEWS

Pierre Assouline, Hergé: The Man Who Created Tintin, trans. Charles Ruas

Jean-Marie Apostolidès, The Metamorphoses of Tintin, or, Tintin for Adults

Stephen E. Tabachnick, ed., Teaching the Graphic Novel

Philippe Delisle, Spirou, Tintin et Cie, une littérature catholique? Années 1930 / Années 1980 [‘Spirou, Tintin and Company, a Catholic Literature? 1930s / 1980s’]

EXHIBITION REVIEW

Archi & BD, La ville dessinée, an exhibition on view at the Cité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine, Paris, from 9 June, 2010 to 28 November, 2010.

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My long 1989

Anticipations of a new Europe

Douglas R. Holmes

Interviews with the leadership of the Movimento Friuli (MF) were the last task, almost a postscript, of a study that preoccupied me during the 1980s. After a decade of research in the Friuli region of northeast Italy I was reasonably satisfied that I had achieved something like closure on the project. I was reluctant in the summer of 1987 to open any new lines of inquiry that might disturb my contentment.

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Neo-liberalism

Dominant but dead

Neil Smith

Some years ago Jürgen Habermas (1991) diagnosed modernism as dominant but dead. Neo- liberalism may still be in its youth, having come to fruition only after the 1970s, but it seems reasonable to conclude that neo-liberalism too is “dominant but dead.” The ferment of new ideas, however much they were simultaneously recycled axia from the earlier liberal tradition, reached its peak in the 1980s.

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Maurizio Cotta

Apart from the event itself, the formation of the second Berlusconi

government is, from a wider perspective, replete with interesting

elements. It facilitates a better understanding of where the transformation

process of the Italian political system stands about 10

years after the crisis of the 1990s. The theme of government – its

process of formation and completion, as well as its political basis

and operational capacity – is of obvious importance. The ‘First

Republic’ was predominantly characterised by the way government

was produced (and how it consequently functioned). It is no coincidence

that the debate on institutional reform that began in the

1980s targeted the issue of government and the need for reform.

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Gerdien Jonker

In this article, I explore the dominant narratives about Islam in German history textbooks from the eighteenth century until the present day. I thereby deconstruct a longue durée script with a rather curious pattern. Until the 1980s, textbook narratives about Islam were rooted exclusively in people's historical imagination. Only when the children of Turkish workers entered the classroom did textbook authors try to accommodate knowledge based on real encounters. By addressing the di erent stages of this longue durée script, I enquire into the functions of narratives as they underpinned a German and European "we."

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Maurizio Carbone

In August 2008, Georgia launched a large-scale attack to retake control

of South Ossetia, an enclave in the northern part of its territory

that had been trying to break away formally since the late 1980s. In

response, Russia bombed not only military but also civilian targets,

claiming that its intervention was meant to protect Russian citizens.

This quick escalation of events raised concerns about other unresolved

conflicts in the South Caucasus. In fact, within a few days, Russian

troops took control of South Ossetia and were ready to start a second

front in Abkhazia, another separatist area within Georgia.

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Ana Prata

Despite recent interest in port issues by researchers across a variety of disciplines, the field of port studies in Portugal would still benefit from a sustained research effort on the part of the academia. There is still much ground to be broken, but the historical picture of Portuguese ports is not as bleak as it was in the 1980s. Even though the future is bright, gaps remain. This article presents existing works and recent trends of research and explores limits and understudied paths.

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Editorial

Open-Themed Issues

Soheila Shahshahani

In the 1970s and 1980s, North and South Yemen appeared to be two states pursuing opposing, sometimes hostile, economic and political policies. Then, in 1990, they suddenly united. This article analyses sport diplomacy as an instrument in opening institutional contacts between the two governments and as a venue for conveying important socio-political and historical messages. Cross-border football contests reinforced the largely invented notion of a single Yemen derived from pre-Islamic kingdoms. This idea remains a foundation of Yemeni nationalism and a base of Yemeni national identity.

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Between Europe and a Hard Place

French Financial Diplomacy from 1995 to 2002

Daphne Josselin

In the mid-1990s, a series of financial crises placed international financial stability and North-South dialogue once again very firmly on the agenda of economic diplomacy. These had long been pet topics for the French: back in the 1960s, President Charles de Gaulle had famously clamoured for the establishment of a new monetary order; the summitry set up, on French initiative, in 1975, had been largely focused on exchange rate stability and North-South relations; in the 1980s, President Mitterrand had made repeated appeals for a “new Bretton Woods.” One could therefore expect the French to contribute actively to debates on how best to reform the international financial architecture.

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Mark E. Spicka

Perhaps the most remarkable development in the Federal Republic

of Germany since World War II has been the creation of its stable

democracy. Already by the second half of the 1950s, political commentators

proclaimed that “Bonn is not Weimar.” Whereas the

Weimar Republic faced the proliferation of splinter parties, the rise

of extremist parties, and the fragmentation of support for liberal and

conservative parties—conditions that led to its ultimate collapse—the

Federal Republic witnessed the blossoming of moderate, broadbased

parties.1 By the end of the 1950s the Christian Democratic

Union/Christian Social Union (CDU), Social Democratic Party

(SPD) and Free Democratic Party (FDP) had formed the basis of a

stable party system that would continue through the 1980s.