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Remembering the "Forgotten Zone"

Recasting the Image of the Post-1945 French Occupation of Germany

Corey Campion

In much of the English-language scholarship on the post-1945 Allied occupation of Germany, French officials appear as little more than late arrivals to the victors’ table, in need of and destined to follow Anglo-American leadership in the emerging Cold War. However, French occupation policies were unique within the western camp and helped lay the foundations of postwar Franco-German reconciliation that are often credited to the 1963 Elysée Treaty. Exploring how the French occupation has been neglected, this article traces the memory of the zone across the often-disconnected work of French-, German-, and English-speaking scholars since the 1950s. Moreover, it outlines new avenues of research that could help historians resurrect the unique experience of the French zone and enrich our appreciation of the Franco-German “motor” on which Europe still relies.

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Performing the Border

Cartographic Enactments of the German-Polish Border among German and Polish High-school Pupils

Marie Sandberg

On the basis of fieldwork conducted in the two towns Görlitz and Zgorzelec, situated directly on the German-Polish border, this article explores how different versions of the border are enacted among Polish and German high-school pupils. As is usually the case with borders, the German-Polish border has a multiple, even ambivalent character. Inspired by the performative approach within actor-network theory, this article aims to qualify the concept of the multiple border, where multiplicity is understood as heterogeneous practices and patterns of absences and presences that constitute the border. The data, based on ethnographic fieldwork, consist of 'cartographies', maps made by the pupils, followed up by 'walking conversations' in the two towns on the border. The analysis shows that the border is not only enacted differently; also it is suggested that the performances all deal with and constitute an ambivalent border.

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Jan Mühlstein

Translator : Lea Muehlstein and Jonathan Magonet

In 2015 the Liberal Jewish community Beth Shalom Munich celebrated its twentieth anniversary alongside many other Liberal Jewish communities across Germany. With a delay of fifty years Liberal Judaism had returned to Germany, the country of its

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Imagined Germany and the Battle of Models in South Korea

Rival Narratives of Germany in South Korean Public Spheres, 1990–2015

Jin-Wook Shin and Boyeong Jeong

their narratives of the “German model” and linked them to visions of their own nation's future. There are several reasons that Germany can be viewed as having special importance. First, Germany has often been thought of as a country that makes a

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The “Alternative for Germany”

Factors Behind its Emergence and Profile of a New Right-wing Populist Party

Frank Decker

The Advent of a New Challenger in the German Party System 1 For most of its history, the Federal Republic of Germany has proven to be a blank space on the map of European right-wing populism. While some right-wing populist and extremist

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Tobias Schulze-Cleven

As scholars and policymakers debate how to combine social inclusion with competitiveness under twenty-first-century economic conditions, the German model of labor relations is again attracting significant attention. Yet, assessments of its

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Doing Her Bit

German and Anglo-American Girls' Literature of the First World War

Jennifer Redmann

This article examines sixteen works of girls' literature published in Germany, Great Britain, the United States and Canada during or immediately after the First World War. When examined together, these books reveal much about expectations and opportunities for girls at a time when gender roles were in flux. Their overriding message, however, is contradictory, for even as a girl is exhorted to serve her country, her gender places clear limits on what she can achieve.

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Samuel Salzborn

The relatively new party known as the Alternative for Germany (Alternative für Deutschland, AfD) and its relationship to right-wing extremism has been the subject of a great deal of intensive discussion among political and social scientists

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Luke B. Wood

Introduction The governmental politics approach to Federal Republic of Germany ( frg ) decision-making continues to provide scholars of German politics with powerful conceptual and theoretical tools to capture the forces driving policy

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Franz-Xaver Kaufmann

Today, "social policy" is an expression used across the globe to denote a broad range of issues, such as old age security, health, housing and so on. But historically, "social policy" had a distinct European origin and a distinct meaning. I maintain that "social policy" and the "welfare state" are more than a list of social services, and also have strong socio-cultural underpinnings that account for the diversity of social policy. The idea of "social policy" emerged in mid-nineteenth-century Germany against the backdrop of secularization and functional differentiation of modern society. I then pinpoint the twentieth-century move from "social policy" to the broader cultural idea of a universalistic "welfare state." The idea emerged internationally as early as the 1940s, even before the post-WWII rise of national welfare states, which, as I argue, differ according to national notions of "state" and "society." To this end, I compare the UK, Sweden, Germany, France, and two non-welfare states, the United States and the Soviet Union.