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Laura T. Di Summa

, criticism as practice, and, as mentioned, a philosophy of criticism. By no means do I intend to address these ramifications here, and there is little I will say with regard to both theories within criticism and its history. This article stems instead from

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Ted Nannicelli

of Engagement shifts gears to a more traditional humanities approach with contributions from a philosopher with extensive experience writing about film and from three film theorists who frequently engage with and draw upon philosophy in their own

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Elemental Imagination and Film Experience

Climate Change and the Cinematic Ethics of Immersive Filmworlds

Ludo de Roo

cinematically foregrounding the natural elements. The scene is driven by and is, quite literally, built on the rich materiality of ancient philosophy's classic elements: it is impossible to think of this hallucinating scene either without the vibrating air or

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Queer Sinofuturism

The Aberrant Movements and Posthumanist Mutations of Body, Identity, and Matter in Lu Yang's Uterus Man

Gabriel Remy-Handfield

posthumanism according to which “the critical post-human subject [is defined] within an eco-philosophy of multiple belongings, as a relational subject constituted in and by multiplicity, that is to say, a subject that works across differences and is also

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Stephen Prince

for the field. Scholars from cognitive science, literature, philosophy, and film studies assess the book’s impact. Its author, David Bordwell, replies to their remarks and shares his contemporary perspective on the book. I thank the participants in

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Stephen Prince

dimensions of meaning and experience. Examining a wide range of films, he approaches the issue from the perspective of analytic philosophy and argues that the ways that viewers embody their sense of race through disgust reactions has implications for

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Ted Nannicelli

explores parallels between the philosophy of Baruch Spinoza (1632–1677) and contemporary work on 4e cognition (that is, cognition that is embodied, embedded, extended, and enacted). Using Lynne Ramsay's You Were Never Really Here (2017) as a case study

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Jonathan Frome

Noël Carroll is one of the most prolific and influential scholars in the philosophy of film and one of only three living scholars profiled in The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film ( Livingston and Plantinga 2008 ). In his wide

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“Mind the Gap”

Between Movies and Mind, Affective Neuroscience, and the Philosophy of Film

Jane Stadler

Naturalized Aesthetics of Film joins Carl Plantinga’s Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (2018) and Mark Johnson’s The Aesthetics of Meaning and Thought: The Bodily Roots of Philosophy, Science, Morality, and Art (2018) in the latest

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Ted Nannicelli

perspectives—and it is also suggestive our future direction: it includes contributions by scholars based in English and comparative literature, film and media studies, psychology, and philosophy. This issue begins with two articles that revisit Russian