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John Shovlin Reimagining Politics After the Terror: The Republican Origins of French Liberalism by Andrew Jainchill

Jann Matlock The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs by David S. Barnes

Christine Haynes The New Bibliopolis: French Book Collectors and the Culture of Print, 1880-1914 by Willa Z. Silverman

Caroline Ford An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Republicanism, 1880–1914 by J. P. Daughton

Martha Hanna Race and War in France: Colonial Subjects in the French Army, 1914-1918 by Richard S. Fogarty

Harry Gamble The Moroccan Soul: French Education, Colonial Ethnology, and Muslim Resistance, 1912-1956 by Spencer D. Segalla

Julian Wright Shades of Indignation: Political Scandals in France, Past and Present by Paul Jankowski

Clifford Rosenberg Liberté, égalité, discriminations: L’‘Identité nationale’ au regard de l’histoire by Patrick Weil

Cheryl B. Welch Critical Republicanism: The Hijab Controversy and Political Philosophy by Cécile Laborde

Katherine C. Donahue Judging Mohammed: Juvenile Delinquency, Immigration, and Exclusion at the Paris Palace of Justice by Susan J. Terrio

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Hide and Seek

Uncovering the Politics of Playtime

Sarah Fishman

Since the publication in 1960 of Philippe Ariès’s foundational, if problematic, Centuries of Childhood, the history of childhood has developed into a rich and varied field. At the annual conference of the Western Society for French History in 2018, a call for panelists for a roundtable on the history of childhood expanded into two separate panels ranging from the medieval era through the thirty glorious postwar years. The panelists and the audience grappled with questions about the social construction of age, the ages of childhood, and the challenges of finding sources for a group that left few “ego documents.” Although children per se never exercised political or global power, attention to children clarifies how critical children were to political and international systems. Material generated by children themselves can be difficult to locate, but adults generated plenty of material about children. The intersectionality of the history of childhood with fields like labor history, urban history, the history of the welfare state, and the history of psychology parallels the intersectionality of children themselves, who come from every race, social class, and gender. All humans, it turns out, start out as children.

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Radical Book History

E. P. Thompson and The Making of the English Working Class

Antoinette Burton

This special issue on E. P. Thompson’s The Making of the English Working Class (1963) grew out of a symposium I organized at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in October 2013 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the book’s publication. I am, on the face of it, one of the least likely modern British historians to be organizing such an event. I can remember the first time I held the weighty tome in my hands: I was a junior in college, in the fall of 1982, and it was on the syllabus for a course I was taking on Victorian Britain, taught by Jonathan Schneer at Yale University. As did many feminist and postcolonial historians of my generation, I struggled with what I saw as Thompson’s indifference to women and gender (oh, those deluded followers of Joanna Southcott!) and his incapacity to see the evidence of race and empire in his sources even when they cried out from below the footnote line for all to see.

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Rebecca Pates and Maximilian Schochow, ed., Der “Ossi:” Mikropolitische Studien über einen symbolischen Ausländer (Wiesbaden: Springer VS, 2013)

Reviewed by René Wolfsteller

Lisa Pine, Education in Nazi Germany (Oxford; New York: Berg, 2010)

Reviewed by Gregory Baldi

Stephen J. Silvia, Holding the Shop Together: German Industrial Relations in the Postwar Era (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013)

Reviewed by Volker Berghahn

Egbert Klautke, The Mind of the Nation: Völkerpsychologie in Germany, 1851-1955 (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2013)

Reviewed by David Freis

Damani J. Partridge, Hypersexuality and Headscarves: Race, Sex and Citizenship in the New Germany (Bloomington: Indiana Universtiy Press, 2012)

Reviewed by Myra Marx Ferree

Moshe Zimmermann, Deutsche gegen Deutsche: Das Schicksal der Juden, 1938-1945 (Berlin: Aufbau-Verlag, 2008; Hebrew trans., Tel Aviv: Am Oved, 2013)

Reviewed by Noga Wolff

Zara Steiner, The Triumph of the Dark: European International History, 1933-1939 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011)

Reviewed by Volker Prott

Stefan Berger and Norman La Porte, Friendly Enemies: Britain and the GDR, 1949-1990 (New York: Berghahn Books, 2010)

Reviewed by Meredith Heiser-Duron

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Surviving Slavery

Sexuality and Female Agency in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth-Century Morocco

Chouki El Hamel

The tragic hero of North African slavery is female. In Morocco in the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century, female slaves, mainly black women originally from West Africa, survived and sometimes thrived by forging emotional bonds with their masters. The striving for survival and the tragic drama of the female slaves' lives entailed emotional and sexual bonds via concubinage. For free Moroccan men concubinage was legalized and was secured by means of the connection to sexual desire. Concubines, that is, enslaved women, used, initially at least, this desire to secure a better position in a servile status within a society where gender was hierarchical: patrilineal and patriarchal. If it was legally and socially established for a male to be entitled to female slave sexuality, it was, as well, legally and socially conventional for the progeny of female slaves to inherit the father's legal status. I use the analysis of the concubinage system as a process to investigate the interplay of agency, emotions, sexuality, identity, race, and gender in Morocco.

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Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

“What is a nation?” Ernest Renan’s famous rhetorical question to an audience at the Sorbonne on 11 March 1882 has remained vital for a wide variety of scholars in fields as diverse as history, literary criticism, sociology, philosophy, and political science. Renan initially posed the question barely ten years after the close of the Franco-Prussian War, which had sparked the establishment of the French Third Republic, the unification of Germany under the leadership of Wilhelm I, and the transfer of the disputed territory of Alsace-Lorraine from French to German control in the months between July 1870 and May 1871. Renan made no overt mention of these events while he was speaking, but he rejected any possible answer to his question that might attempt to base the creation of nations and national identities on shared “race, language, [economic] interests, religious affinity, geography, [or] military necessities.” This explicit refusal constituted an implicit rejection of the entire range of German justifications for the acquisition of the two recently French border provinces.

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Eloise Grey

such large numbers that stereotypes abound. 9 At the same time, the “new imperial history” spoke to postcolonial and poststructuralist perspectives such as race, culture, and gender and attempted to cut across national stories and in particular the

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Heritage or hate?

A pedagogical guide to the confederate flag in post-race America

Cameron D. Lippard

per cent saw it as representing racism. By 2015, Jones (2015) reported 54 per cent of Americans saw the flag as about Southern pride whereas 34 per cent saw it as representing racism. However, there are important differences based on the race of

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Must Labour Lose?

The 1959 election and the politics of the people

Charlotte Lydia Riley

comfortable in a society in which the old and sick are not decently cared for.” 18 The manifesto also included a long critique of the Suez Crisis, a condemnation of the arms race, and finished on a stirring critique of the existence of two worlds, “one white

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compromis particulier (Vol. 33, No. 3, 24) MANAGAN, Kathe . “One Hand Washes the Other”: Social Capital and the Politics of Leisure in Guadeloupean Associations (Vol. 33, No. 3, 75) MARKER, Emily . Obscuring Race: Franco-African Conversations about