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Asiye Kaya

The year 2011 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the bilateral recruitment

agreement that the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) signed with

the Republic of Turkey in 1961. According to official figures, the immigrant

group with roots in Turkey and its offspring make the second largest

group currently after ethnic German emigrants (resettlers) in Germany.

Understanding this migration experience and the broader issues of immigration

in Germany is the motivation behind this special issue.

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Tourism for Peace?

Reflections on a Village Tourism Project in Cyprus

Julie Scott

On 1 May 2004, the Republic of Cyprus entered the European Union, unaccompanied by the Turkish-Cypriot population in the northern third of the island. The Green Line - the militarized border marking the cessation of hostilities in 1974 - now defines the outer edge of the European Union, creating a fluid and uncertain borderland which has become the focus for ongoing attempts to construct both the new Cyprus and the new Europe. Tourism has a central and contradictory role to play in these processes. It offers an avenue for stimulating economic activity and raising income levels in the Turkish-Cypriot north, and presents an opportunity to develop complementary tourism products north and south which could widen the appeal of the island as a whole and promote collaborative ventures between Greek- and Turkish-Cypriots. On the other hand, such developments face strong resistance from sections of the population north and south, who fear they will lead either to the legitimation and tacit recognition of the Turkish-Cypriot state in the north, or to a return to relations characterized by Greek-Cypriot dominance and Turkish-Cypriot dependence. The paper reflects on the author's involvement in a village tourism development project in Cyprus in 2005-2006 in order to explore what an anthropological approach to the use of tourism for political ends can tell us about conflict, and when, and under what conditions, tourism might be a force for peace and reconciliation.

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H.S. Hundley

The location of the capital of the Mongolian Empire, Kharakorum, had been lost to outsiders for centuries. In the summer of 1889, Nicholas Mikhailovich Iadrintsev, author, editor, and publisher of the newspaper Vostochnoe Obozrenie went in search of Kharakorum. As an oblastnik, Iadrintsev went on this quest to further understanding of Inner Asia's history. He quickly discovered its location in the Orkhon Valley, and the extremely significant Kultigin Stones, the first known Turkish writing of the first Turkish state. Iadrintsev's role in these discoveries and subsequent activity, are the subject of this research report.

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Lucien Gubbay

The Ottomans were descended from one of the many clans of Turkish nomads who swept westwards from the steppes of Central Asia and decisively defeated the enfeebled Byzantine Empire at the battle of Manzikert in 1071. The tribesmen converted to Islam and then slowly expanded their grip on Byzantine territory in Anatolia.

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Sabina Stan and Fiona Murphy

Esin Bozkurt (2009), Conceptualising 'Home': The Question of Belonging Among Turkish Families in Germany (Frankfurt/M. and New York: Campus), 243 pp., Pb: €32.90, ISBN: 978-3593387918.

Brigitte Bönisch-Brednich and Catherine Trundle (eds) (2010), Local Lives: Migration and the Politics of Place (Aldershot: Ashgate), 218 pp., Hb: £55.00, ISBN: 978-1-4094-0103-2.

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Adriana Zaharijević, Kristen Ghodsee, Efi Kanner, Árpád von Klimó, Matthew Stibbe, Tatiana Zhurzhenko, Žarka Svirčev, Agata Ignaciuk, Sophia Kuhnle, Ana Miškovska Kajevska, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Marina Hughson, Sanja Petrović Todosijević, Enriketa Papa-Pandelejmoni, Stanislava Barać, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Selin Çağatay, and Agnieszka Mrozik

://hdl.handle.net/11419/2585 , ISBN: 978-960-603-290-5. Provided free of charge by the Association of Greek Academic Libraries. Book review by Efi Kanner Faculty of Turkish Studies and Modern Asian Studies National and Kapodistrian University of Athens This book

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'No More than Two with Caesarean'

The C-section at the Intersection of Pronatalism and Ethnicity in Turkey

Hatice Erten

In this article, I investigate the politicisation of the Caesarean-section (C-section) in Turkey as an anti-natalist procedure. In 2012, the Turkish state began to implement a series of interventions to lower the high rates of birth by C-section, which culminated in an attempted ban on elective C-section. In a previously unseen way, I argue that this intervention was based on the logic that because women are not medically recommended to undergo several C-sections, this surgical procedure limits the number of children a woman can give birth to, causing a concomitant decrease in population growth rates. This article traces the ways in which pronatalist discourses and interventions become meaningful in the medical setting by addressing the politicisation of C-sections. It examines how the C-section reflects a particular population discourse, which is marked by a moral language that stigmatises the fertility of Kurdish women.

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Shari’a and ‘traditional Tatar Islam’

From Flexibility to Protection

Rozaliya Garipova

Like all the elites of post-Soviet Muslim countries, the political elite and religious officials in Russia have been in the search of a moderate and strictly national Islamic identity, to keep the Muslim population of Russia separate from Arab or Turkish versions of Islam that could be politicised and thus had the potential to undermine the state structure. ‘Tatar traditional Islam’ emerged through this framework.

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Azade Seyhan

In this article, I read selected texts of two of the most prominent Turkish born authors of Berlin, Aras Ören and Emine Sevgi Özdamar, as poetic projects of confronting and grasping the vicissitudes of modernity's troubled path both in their homeland and in their experience of German history and culture. My reasons for the emphasis on the work of these writers derives from their various positions between two languages and literary traditions and their ability to negotiate various nuances of "German" and "Turk" and the lived experience of these contested categories. "A poet is a member of that minority that refuses to be part of any official minority, because a poet knows what it is to belong among those walking in broad daylight, as well as those hiding behind closed shutters," writes Charles Simic, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet from the former Yugoslavia. Ören, a Wahlberliner (a Berliner by choice), is arguably the keenest observer and chronicler of cultural clashes and shared destinies between the Turkish and German residents of Berlin's Kreuzberg area. The streets of Ören's Kreuzberg become stages where the competing errors of Turkish and German pasts are reenacted in the present.

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Maria Bucur, Alexandra Ghit, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Ivana Pantelić, Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Elizabeth A. Wood, Anna Müller, Galina Goncharova, Zorana Antonijević, Katarzyna Sierakowska, Andrea Feldman, Maria Kokkinou, Alexandra Zavos, Marija M. Bulatović, Siobhán Hearne, and Rayna Gavrilova

. Aslı Davaz, Eşitsiz kız kardeşlik, uluslararası ve Ortadoğu kadın hareketleri, 1935 Kongresi ve Türk Kadın Birliği (Unequal sisterhood, international and Middle Eastern women's movements, 1935 Congress and the Turkish Women's Union), İstanbul: Türkiye