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From Selfies to Sexting

Tween Girls, Intimacy, and Subjectivities

Antonio García-Gómez

conceptualization of sexual agency endorses the most common gender stereotypes that boys have a constant desire to have sex and that these other girls who show a different attitude towards sex are sluts. By self-presenting as good girls, they attempt to relate to

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Natalie Clark

healthy resistance strategies and to develop an “oppositional gaze” (hooks, 1992:115) is crucial; we need, in other words, to offer them support them to resist stereotypes and to replace these with strong and affirming messages and images of themselves

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“Stumbling Upon Feminism”

Teenage Girls’ Forays into Digital and School-Based Feminisms

Crystal Kim and Jessica Ringrose

possibilities of feminism. These virtual spaces can offer girls opportunities to explore their identity and society by providing spaces in which they feel unencumbered by overwhelming expectations and negative stereotypes surrounding teen feminists In Real Life

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Negotiating Identities

Being “Boy,” Being “Filipino,” Being “Other”

Victoria Cann

men seem to place importance on men being perceived as strong in the public eye and avoiding associations of weakness and effeminacy” (2009: 71). This may be in part due to the feminization of Asian men in Western culture, and of “stereotypically

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When Jackie Coogan Had His Hair Cut

Masculinity, Maturity, and the Movies in the 1920s

Peter W. Lee

as an over-aged cute moppet, but in such a way as to lay the foundations for a career as a serious leading man and not, by implication, a stereotyped flaming youth of the Roaring Twenties. The plan ultimately failed: Jackie’s new image could not

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Groped and Gutted

Hollywood's Hegemonic Reimagining of Counterculture

Samantha Eddy

-Guzman (2016) terms this the “Hollywood Paradox”: seemingly, Hollywood emerges as a subject of diversification in mainstream media and yet the mechanisms of legitimate diversification—beyond tokenizing or stereotyping—are actively blockaded by Hollywood

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Close to You

Karen Carpenter and the Body-Martyr in Queer Memory

Julian Binder

Abstract

There has been much thought given to role of the body as a site of political, physiological, and cultural negotiation. What place then does the beloved and astonishingly affective singer of 1970s soft-rock, Karen Carpenter, occupy in this weighty discourse? Karen's death from complications related to her eating disorder in 1983 shocked the public, eliciting a new wave of cultural consciousness about the embodied nature of mental illness. But beyond the stereotypical white suburban Carpenters fan, Karen and her story had already become a cult favorite amongst the queer avant-garde as soon as four years after death, a mysterious phenomenon that I argue is decidedly queer in its emotional trafficking of Karen's subjectivity, among other areas. This essay explores the ways in which our bodies double as cultural repositories, as hallowed sites of memory, and as icons of martyrdom with the capacity to emit a healing resonance analogous to their fabricated religious counterparts. I must admit, this paper might also be guilty of occasionally engaging in the typical essentializing tendency toward Karen's personhood. For her sake then, reader, I ask you to ponder the following question with the same aversion to neat finality that you apply to your own story as you flip the page: who really was Karen Carpenter?

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Steven Eastwood

instead concentrated on embodiment, networks, relations, and patterns. Autism Defined Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a disorder that affects the development of social and communication skills and is characterized by stereotyped patterns of

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Redefining Representation

Black Trans and Queer Women’s Digital Media Production

Moya Bailey

, their fears of discrimination are often validated. In a 2004 study, researchers identified nine ways that providers contributed to disparities in care. These included unintentionally relying on stereotypes about racial groups, particularly when pressed

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Linda Howell, Ryan Bell, Laura Helen Marks, Jennifer L. Lieberman, and Joseph Christopher Schaub

globally distributed by a subscription-based video-streaming service. It seems to demand a sophisticated awareness of the ways that these new modalities influence not just the production of stereotypes, but the complex new circumstances in which they