Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 845 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Thinking about Thinking

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Finding Continuity in US Military Veterans’ Embodied Minds

Anna Zogas

of TBI. Based on ethnographic research in one such clinic, I analyse a programme specifically designed for veterans attending colleges and trade schools. Although the programme is held in the clinic, it mimics a college classroom, complete with a

Restricted access

Andrei V. Grinëv

trade was carried out by foreign ships (95.7 percent). 2 This situation was the result of the general backwardness of the Russian economy, especially in comparison with Western countries, which had already embarked by this time on the path of capitalist

Restricted access

Nighttime Navigating

Moving a Container Ship through Darkness

Maria Borovnik

for docking duties in ports. 21 Joyful social evening occasions are welcome yet may feel as though times of rest are being traded in for little fun. Social studies of darkness and light have mostly looked at land-based everyday (or night) experiences

Restricted access

Making Space for Sanctions

The Economics of German Natural Gas Imports from Russia, 1982 and 2014 Compared

Stephen G. Gross

dependent on trade with Russia. 1 The foundation of Germany’s economic relationship with Russia is energy. Germany relies on Russia for 36 percent of its natural gas and 39 percent of its oil. Some of the largest German enterprises operating in Russia, such

Restricted access

Graham Holderness, Sue Dymoke, Simon Curtis, Michael Bartholomew-Biggs, Stuart Flynn, Rennie Parker, and Lawrence Sail

The Invisible Man GRAHAM HOLDERNESS

On Lake Oscanawa American Sound SUE DYMOKE

Back Home … SIMON CURTIS

Battle Training MICHAEL BARTHOLOMEW-BIGGS

Mandatory Post-Colonial Poem STUART FLYNN

Only Resting Trading Up RENNIE PARKER

Cutting the Bay Hedge LAWRENCE SAIL

Restricted access

“Montag ist wieder Pegida-Tag!”

Pegida’s Community Building and Discursive Strategies

Helga Druxes

a paradox in that they are anti-modern identitarians pining for a mythic Central Europe, regressively protectionist towards the German economy in their demands to close the borders to international trade, exit the Euro zone, and expel refugees, even

Restricted access

Eva Kolinsky

In the political and economic history of Germany, Leipzig already

held a special place long before unification. Since the middle ages, it

has hosted one of the most important trade fairs in Europe. When

industrialization turned Germany in the late nineteenth century into

a leading European power, outpacing France and closely rivaling

Britain, Leipzig added to its established and internationally acclaimed

fur and book trade a mighty industrial sector in lignite-based chemicals

and vehicle production. At the turn of the century, Leipzig was

one of the largest and most affluent cities of Germany and indeed

Europe. A rich stock of Gründerzeit houses remains to testify to this

illustrious past.

Restricted access

When Time is Money

Contested Rationalities of Time in the Theory and Practice of Work

Barbara Adam

At the beginning of the twenty-first century work has attained a new local and global quality. Localised and individualised efficiency deals are established where previously standards would have been set nationally and bargained for collectively. At the same time, work is negotiated in the context of a global labour market and global competition: the world, not nations, is the market where labour is traded and the fate of much future work sealed. Electronic communication, low transport costs and deregulated, unrestricted trade dissolved many of the boundaries that used to delimit the competition for work on the one hand, the negotiations over conditions on the other. Since the leading industrial nations have committed themselves to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the rules set out by the World Trade Organisation (WTO), it is difficult for any nation to extricate itself from the logic of the competitive global market. ‘At a world level’, as Hans-Peter Martin and Harald Schumann (1997: 7) point out, ‘more than 40,000 transnational corporations of varying shapes and sizes play off their own employees (as well as different nation states) against one another.’ There are always workers somewhere else able and willing to do the job cheaper than North Americans or North/West Europeans.

Restricted access

Slavery as the commodification of people

Wa "slaves" and their Chinese "sisters"

Magnus Fiskesjö

In the 1950s, teams of Chinese government ethnologists helped liberate “slaves” whom they identified among the Wa people in the course of China’s military annexation and pacification of the formerly autonomous Wa lands, between China and Burma. For the Chinese, the “discovery” of these “slaves” proved the Engels-Morganian evolutionist theory that the supposedly primitive and therefore predominantly egalitarian Wa society was teetering on the threshold between Ur- Communism and ancient slavery. A closer examination of the historical and cultural context of slavery in China and in the Wa lands reveals a different dynamics of commodification, which also sheds light on slavery more generally. In this article I discuss the rejection of slavery under Wa kinship ideology, the adoption of child war captives, and the anomalous Chinese mine slaves in the Wa lands. I also discuss the trade in people emerging with the opium export economy of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century which helped sustain, yet also threatened, autonomous Wa society. I suggest that past Wa “slave” trade was spurred by the same processes of commodification that historically drove the Chinese trade in people, and in recent decades have produced the large-scale human trafficking across Asia, which UN officials have labeled “the largest slave trade in history” and which often hides slavery under the cover of kinship.

Restricted access

Martin Carnoy

Few dispute the notion that the rapid development of industrialising economies in Asia and Latin America, new information technologies, liberalisation of trade, and global financial markets have contributed to the emergence of a truly global economy in the past ten years. Neither do they dispute that national economies almost everywhere in the world have become increasingly less ‘national’. Most countries’ foreign trade has increased, and in many, foreign investment and payment on foreign debt have become more prevalent than in the past. Labour movements also appear to be increasing, especially the movement of highly skilled labour. But does this mean that nation-states have decreased influence over the definition of economic and social life? Does globalisation imply the demise of the nation-state?