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Rethymno, Crete 9-11 December 2003

Oxford 15 November 2003 28 February 2004 19 June 2004

Perugia 13-14 May 2004

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We begin this issue with a Symposium entitled “Sartre and Terror.” It is introduced by Kenneth Anderson and it opens with a translation by Elizabeth Bowman of Sartre’s commentary on the 1972 Munich massacre. She has prefaced it with a summary of events. Next Ronald Aronson focuses on the events of 9/11 and distinguishes between permissible and destructive violence.

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Jennifer Ang Mei Sze

Sartrean ontological intersubjectivity is often understood to be hostile and conflictive, and Sartrean dialectics is repeatedly interpreted through the lenses of the Hegelian master-slave dyad, translating into a conflictive theory of practical ensembles. Building on this, critics in the aftermath of 9/11 argued that 'terror' and 'revolutionary violence' introduced in Critique of Dialectical Reason as the anti-thesis of oppression underscored his anti-colonial writings and this gives us justification to think that Sartre might consider terrorism a form of revolutionary violence.

With this in mind, this paper does not deal with the bigger issue of Sartre's political position, but only aims to question the basis of reading Hegelian dialectics in Sartre's ontology of intersubjectivity and social ensembles. Revisiting the role of dialectics in his Search for a Method and Critique of Dialectical Reason, it reveals a Sartre who is critical of Hegelian dialectics, and establishes his intersubjectivity as more compatible with Heidegger's being-with-others rather than Hegel's being-for-others.

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Betsy Bowman and Bob Stone

The question whether, in the interim, the "socialist morality" allows adequate restraint on revolutionary action, cannot fairly be answered in abstraction from history, in this case our epoch. We submit that the group of projects called corporate "globalization" - imposing free trade, privatization, and dominance of transnational corporations - shapes that epoch. These projects are associated with polarization of wealth, deepening poverty, and an alarming new global U.S. military domination. Using 9/11 as pretext for a "war on terror," this domination backs corporate globalization. If Nazi occupation of France and French occupation of Algeria made Sartre and Beauvoir assign moral primacy to overcoming oppressive systems, then U.S. global occupation should occasion rebirth of that commitment. Parallels among the three occupations are striking. France's turning of colonial and metropolitan working classes against each other is echoed by globalization's pitting of (e.g.) Chinese against Mexican workers in a race to lower wages to get investment. Seducing first-world workers with racial superiority and cheap imports from near-slavery producers once again conceals their thralldom to their own bosses. Nazi and French use of overwhelming force and even torture are re-cycled by the U.S. and its agents, again to hide the vulnerability of their small forces amidst their enemies.

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Counter-Violence and Islamic Terrorism

Is Liberation without Freedom Possible?

Maria Russo

Studies International 11, nos 1–2 (2005): 251–264, 261. 5 Many authors have thought back to Sartre and his analysis of violence after the events of 9/11. Sartre certainly gave priority to his engagement over his philosophical analysis. The possibility

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Toward Comprehensive Conceptualizations of Contemporary Public Health

Participation as the Cornerstone of Appropriate Methodologies

Harry Nijhuis

Healthy Public Policy .” Canadian Journal of Public Health 76 ( S1 ): 911 Hancock , T . 1988 . Promoting Health in the Urban Context . WHO Healthy Cities Papers No. 1. Copenhagen : FADL . Henrÿ , H . 2015 . “ Social Justice through