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John H. Gillespie

This two-part article examines whether Sartre's final interviews, recorded in L'Espoir maintenant [Hope Now], indicate a final turn to belief through an overview of his engagement with the idea of God throughout his career. In Part 1 we examine Sartre's early atheism, but note the pervasive nature of secularised Christian metaphors and concepts in his religion of letters and the centrality of man's desire to be God in Being and Nothingness. His theoretical writings seek to refute the idea of God, but in doing so God is paradoxically both absent and present. In Part 2 we assess his anti-theism and consider his final encounter with theism in L'Espoir maintenant, arguing that it is part of Sartre's long-term engagement with the idea of God.

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John H. Gillespie

These two articles examine whether Sartre's final interviews, recorded in L'Espoir maintenant (Hope Now) indicate a final turn to God and religious belief through an overview of his engagement with the idea of God throughout his career. Part 1, published in Sartre Studies International 19, no. 1, examined Sartre's early atheism, but noted the pervasive nature of secularised Christian metaphors and concepts in his religion of letters and also the centrality of mankind's desire to be God in L'Etre et le néant (Being and Nothingness). Sartre's theoretical writings sought to refute the idea of God, but in doing so, made God paradoxically both absent and present. Part 2 considers Sartre's anti-theism and its implications for his involvement with the idea of God before examining in detail his final encounter with theism as outlined in L'Espoir maintenant, arguing that it is part of Sartre's long-term engagement with the divine, but refuting the idea that he became a theist at the end of his life.

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Steven Matthews

I take it that, when thinking through notions of literature and history in the Thirties, and of the Thirties text in history, it is essential to look at the ways in which the text has become established within historical narratives of the Thirties, as well as the relationship to history which the text seeks to establish for itself. For the two seem curiously interwoven in the subsequent formulations of the distinctiveness of the period, whereby claims made in the Thirties find their absolute echoes in later narratives of its ideas and patternings.

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Daniel O'Shiel

Nature, God as radical Otherness, and God as absolute Value—all of which have not been fully recognised until now. On the back of this I will show, thirdly, that because God in a more theoretical—which is to say philosophical, theological or otherwise

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Terry Gifford, Anna Stenning, David Arnold, Pippa Marland, A.D. Harvey, Christopher North, Michael Conley, Mohammad Shafiqul Islam, and Kate Wise

might have stood, and yet fell. Nor can they justly accuse Their Maker or their making, or their fate, as if predestination overruled their will disposed by absolute decree or high foreknowledge. The high decree unchangeable, eternal. Self tempted, self

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The Shades of a Shadow

Crime as the Dark Projection of Authority in Early Modern England

Maurizio Ascari

ridiculed by playwrights because of its popular connotations. The second is a ‘panoptic’ mode of surveillance that amounted to a ‘dream’ of absolute power, conflating the political and the religious, and that operated only as a discourse, although its

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Green Fields and Blue Roads

The Melancholy of the Girl Walker in Irish Women’s Fiction

Maureen O’Connor

. In both cases, the girl-heroes effect a transmutation of their experience, and use melancholy, as Kristeva suggests artists do, as a source of creative inspiration. Morton argues that ‘melancholia is an ethical act of absolute refusal’, 38 part of

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Alienation, Ambivalence and Identity

Jhumpa Lahiri’s In Other Words

Mohammad Shafiqul Islam

of Daphne, and her sense of ambiguity about her future are what give an absolute form to In Other Words , her only work of nonfiction and a beautiful piece of literature. Notes 1 Dwight Garner, ‘Jhumpa Lahiri’s In Other Words , a Writer’s Headlong

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The Non-Secular Pilgrimage

Walking and Looking in Ken Cockburn and Alec Finlay’s The Road North

Alice Tarbuck and Simone Kotva

, turning them into what Aristotle called ‘second natures’. 71 At its centre is the poet-walker who has ‘shed their needles’: a generatively emptied self, a ‘firm zero of orientation’ or ‘absolute here’, as Husserl describes it in his phenomenological

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Bilal Tawfiq Hamamra

despotic domination and unjust authority in all social institutions’ (81). Tuqan tells the reader that her father and uncle ‘represented, in the most flagrant manner possible, the rigidity of the Arab male and his absolute inability to maintain a