Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 28 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Sartre in Austria

Boycott, Scandals, and the Fight for Peace

Juliane Werner

“It means a lot to me that in the Western European countries, namely in Germany, in Switzerland, and in Austria, attention is given and justice is done to my writings.” — Jean-Paul Sartre, Die Presse, 12 July 1952 When Sartre first arrives in

Restricted access

Eva-Sabine Zehelein

Some fifteen years ago, a distinguished chemistry professor at Stanford University closed his lab in order to write autobiographies, novels and plays. The ‘(god)father of the pill’ (a term he has often criticized) has received numerous scientific prizes and honours. Carl Djerassi is one of the few American scientists to have been awarded both the National Medal of Science (1973) and the National Medal of Technology (1992). He has been called an outstanding scientific hero of the twentieth century, well-situated in the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and now even immortalized on an Austrian postal stamp. Djerassi decided to fence off his own personal garden patch on the vast prairies of belles lettres, and to create his own literary genre.

Restricted access

Relocating an Idyll

How British Travel Writers Presented the Carpathians, 1862-1912

Lily Ford

Thus responded Lion Phillimore to the English landscape, on a train to Folkstone in the summer of 1912. Phillimore was headed for Cracow, and a tour of the Carpathians, a mountain range that encompassed what was then Austrian Poland (including the regions of Galicia, Ruthenia and Moravia) and parts of Hungary and Romania. Her and her husband’s insistence on sleeping rough and travelling with only a horse and cart and a teenage guide may have perplexed the locals, much to the Phillimores’ delight, but the novelty would have been far less to the British public who would read her account of the tour. In the Carpathians has many of the hallmarks of the twentieth-century genre of travel writing identified by Paul Fussell (1981: 209–211) and Mark Cocker (1992: 157–9). Phillimore journeys eastwards on European rails to escape encroaching modernity, to shake off the ‘industrialism’ that plagues her vision every time she looks out of the train window right through Germany into Poland; her destination ‘the last capital in Europe untouched by civilisation and in which the glamour of the Middle Ages still lingered’ (Phillimore 1912: 12).

Restricted access

Adrian van den Hoven

Neither the apparently cold-blooded murder of a complete stranger, the central event in The Stranger, nor Hugo's murder of Hoederer in Dirty Hands—a political assassination or crime of passion, depending on how one views it—can be considered unusual acts, in literature or in life. The topic of murder has itself created an extremely popular genre: the detective novel or "whodunit," which has become a huge industry and has aficionados everywhere, Sartre being one. In French theater, the topic of political assassination has resulted in such famous plays as de Musset's Lorenzaccio (1834), which ostensibly deals with Florence in the sixteenth century and the tyrannical Alexandre de Médicis, who is assassinated by his young cousin, but is in fact "a limpid transposition of the failed revolution of July 1830." It is well known that Sartre was an admirer of Musset and Romantic theater. In 1946, Jean Cocteau, who helped with the staging of Les Mains sales (Dirty Hands), wrote L'Aigle ` deux têtes (The Two-Headed Eagle), which was inspired "by the sad life of Empress Elisabeth of Austria and her tragic death by the hand of the Franco-Italian assassin, Luigi Lucheni." Sartre himself, in Nausea, has Anny use the engraving in Michelet's Histoire de France depicting the assassination of the Duke de Guise as a perfect illustration of "privileged situations."

Free access

David Detmer and John Ireland

—Sartre’s participation in the 1952 World Congress of People for Peace in Vienna, and his canceling the premiere of his play Les Mains sales in that city — Juliane Werner sheds new light on Sartre’s political evolution, the reception of his ideas in Austria, and his

Restricted access

Walking to Write

Following Patrick Leigh Fermor across Europe

David Wills

through the traffic lanes” (54). But he argues that, in many places, the fundamental values and essence of the past remain. In Austria, though dams have disrupted the wild water flow and obscured the ancient landscape, “The Danube’s apparent domestication

Restricted access

“Give Me Back My Son!”

Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emotion Talk, and the Gendering of Political Rhetoric

Linda E. Mitchell

Austria in December 1192, and then Leopold turned Richard over to his liege, Emperor Henry VI, in April 1193. Both men were irritated with Richard for supporting the imperial claims of Henry the Lion of Saxony over those of the Staufen Dynasty, as well as

Restricted access

Jackie Clarke, Melanie Kay Smith, Margret Jäger, Anne O’Connor, and Robert Shepherd

quickly growing, anthropology may have much to contribute to the understanding of developments within the field. Margret Jäger Sigmund Freud Private University Linz, Austria Raphaёl Ingelbien , Irish Cultures of Travel: Writing on the

Restricted access

William Nessly, Noel B. Salazar, Kemal Kantarci, Evan Koike, Christian Kahl, and Cyril Isnart

she interact with the non-English speakers (among others, Germans, Swiss, Austrians, Belgians, and Russians)? And, in light of the diversification of tourists, were there no non-Western tourists at all? From a stylistic point of view, I missed

Restricted access

“Space without People”

Austro-German Filmmaker, Bestselling Author, and Journalist Colin Ross Discovers Australia

Siegfried Mattl

government preferred secret diplomacy to prevent sanctions by the signatories of the peace treaties and instructed the print media with respective codes of behavior ( Torma 2011: 168ff. ), Ross toured Germany and Austria as a lecturer, attracting large