Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • French Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Sartre in Austria

Boycott, Scandals, and the Fight for Peace

Juliane Werner

“It means a lot to me that in the Western European countries, namely in Germany, in Switzerland, and in Austria, attention is given and justice is done to my writings.” — Jean-Paul Sartre, Die Presse, 12 July 1952 When Sartre first arrives in

Restricted access

Adrian van den Hoven

Neither the apparently cold-blooded murder of a complete stranger, the central event in The Stranger, nor Hugo's murder of Hoederer in Dirty Hands—a political assassination or crime of passion, depending on how one views it—can be considered unusual acts, in literature or in life. The topic of murder has itself created an extremely popular genre: the detective novel or "whodunit," which has become a huge industry and has aficionados everywhere, Sartre being one. In French theater, the topic of political assassination has resulted in such famous plays as de Musset's Lorenzaccio (1834), which ostensibly deals with Florence in the sixteenth century and the tyrannical Alexandre de Médicis, who is assassinated by his young cousin, but is in fact "a limpid transposition of the failed revolution of July 1830." It is well known that Sartre was an admirer of Musset and Romantic theater. In 1946, Jean Cocteau, who helped with the staging of Les Mains sales (Dirty Hands), wrote L'Aigle ` deux têtes (The Two-Headed Eagle), which was inspired "by the sad life of Empress Elisabeth of Austria and her tragic death by the hand of the Franco-Italian assassin, Luigi Lucheni." Sartre himself, in Nausea, has Anny use the engraving in Michelet's Histoire de France depicting the assassination of the Duke de Guise as a perfect illustration of "privileged situations."

Free access

David Detmer and John Ireland

—Sartre’s participation in the 1952 World Congress of People for Peace in Vienna, and his canceling the premiere of his play Les Mains sales in that city — Juliane Werner sheds new light on Sartre’s political evolution, the reception of his ideas in Austria, and his

Restricted access

Matthew Eshleman

a page from the Austrian school of economics, Irwin argues that our epistemic limits (with regards to large-scale, economic decision making) require (bad) faith in an invisible hand that will allow markets to self-regulate (Chapter Seven). In short