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Thomas K. Hubbard

Adolescent sexuality has been at the forefront of the recent “Culture Wars,” as is clear from the many news stories and political battles over issues such as sex education, teen pregnancy and STDs, Child Sexual Abuse, enhanced legal regulation of sex offenders, pedophiles on the internet, “sexting” and child pornography. On the one hand adolescents today are more sexually mature than at most historical periods: physical puberty occurs ever earlier (Moller, 1987), while children’s capacity to access the same media as adults grows ever more sophisticated. Already in 1982, Neil Postman presciently observed that electronic media had obliterated the historical technological superiority of literate adults relative to not‐yet‐fully-literate children (Postman, 1982). At that point, he was thinking mainly of television, but his observation has become even more true in the digital age, when adolescents are often the ones teaching their parents and grandparents. 1982 had not yet grasped what would be the ubiquity of MTV or cheap, highly graphic visual pornography in many parents’ closets, or if not there, on their kids’ computer screens. Children have become the most clever at accessing media at precisely the time when popular media culture is more saturated with verbal, musical, and visual images of sexuality than ever before.

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Tweens as Technofeminists

Exploring Girlhood Identity in Technology Camp

Jen England and Robert Cannella

various media. To reconceptualize often male-dominated tech spaces, we framed GRTC 2016 around a theme: What does it mean to be a girl in the digital age? We unpacked and explored this theme through discussing, blogging, workshopping, and completing a

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J. Cammaert Raval

-standing Luo-Kikuyu power politics; and how an uncut man, once discovered, can face immediate emasculation by his community. Forced circumcisions of the uncut have taken on new forms in the digital age, as the sensationalized Twitter handle #gocutmyhusband has

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Terms of Silence

Weaknesses in Corporate and Law Enforcement Responses to Cyberviolence against Girls

Suzanne Dunn, Julie S. Lalonde, and Jane Bailey

the Digital Age .” In Bailey and Steeves 2015 : 229 – 252 . Gandy , Imani . 2014 . “ #TwitterFail: Twitter’s Refusal to Handle Online Stalkers, Abusers, and Haters .” Rewire , 12 August . https://rewire.news/article/2014/08/12/twitterfail

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Paula MacDowell

Who or what represents girlhood and girl culture in the global, digital age? How are girls’ identities marketed, distributed, and consumed by popular media texts that are persistently communicating gender messages with attitudes, interpretations

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The Doll “InbeTween”

Online Doll Videos and the Intertextuality of Tween Girl Culture

Jessica E. Johnston

’ve been making videos since before you were born.” The American Girl doll on AGTube functions as an object that reflects on what it means to be a tween growing up in the digital age. Sandra Weber and Claudia Mitchell refer to technological productions as

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My Words, My Literacy

Tracking of and Teaching through the On-Field Language Practices of Australian Indigenous Boys

David Caldwell, Nayia Cominos, and Katie Gloede

collection Making the Connection: Essays on Indigenous Digital Excellence ( Telstra Foundation 2014 ), and captured in Jackie Huggins’s foreword: The digital age is here to stay and no matter how we might resist it, it won’t go away. As Indigenous

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Digitizing the Western Gaze

The End FGM Guardian Global Media Campaign

Jessica Cammaert

. Thus, the incorporation of Amin and Ahmed’s documentary within End FGM can be explained by its documentary form, and its uncompromising, swift juxtaposition of tradition and modernity in a fast-moving digital-age. This tendency was aptly demonstrated in

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

digital age. Screening us from some bodies; screening and streaming us to others. The editors of Screen Bodies look forward to the conversation that will grow out of this fine ground for critical inquiry. References apulrang . 2015

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Redefining Representation

Black Trans and Queer Women’s Digital Media Production

Moya Bailey

this context, love and care can manifest as societal regard for Black life and health but, more significantly, affirm the self within a nation state that does not. In our digital age, young people are utilizing the Internet to redefine representation