Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 137 items for :

  • "Enlightenment" x
  • Anthropology x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Twilight of the Enlightenment

The Art Fair, the Culture Industry, and the ‘Creative Class’

Judith Kapferer

The complicity of the arts and the state in the mutual legitimation of corporate market practice is addressed in this critique of the so-called culture industries and 'Creative Class' of late capitalist imagination. The certification of the state-market couple as the dominant ideology of national, transnational, and post-national politics and economics is examined through an analysis of the Frieze Art Fair between 2006 and 2009. I contend that the decline of a culture-debating society and the rise of a culture-consuming society herald the waning of a habit of independent rationality and informed argument that characterized Horkheimer and Adorno's 'Enlightenment project'. The managerialist moment in the arts (as in education) signifies the diminishing status of culture as the cornerstone of an enlightened social formation.

Restricted access

In the Eyes of Some Britons

Aleppo, an Enlightenment City

Mohammad Sakhnini

globalist, were steeped in the context of their entanglement with the world of others. 1 It was a traveling experience that shows how Enlightenment toleration, sociability, and living in peace with and among others also existed in Aleppo, a place many

Restricted access

Tim Ingold

, humando , itself derived from humus , soil. 1 Humans, then, would above all be people of the soil, who bury their dead. They come from the earth and will ever return to it. Enlightenment thinkers, however, among them Vico himself, would eventually upend

Restricted access

Anna Tsing

trained in our discipline: tap our constitutive ambivalence about the Enlightenment figure Man. Working through this figure might provide a better description of current environmental nightmares. Our condition, I argue: Earth stalked by Man. 1 Another

Restricted access

Nicholas F. Russell

only they followed Chinese precepts closely enough. It was the difference between these two cases—the one representing an era’s finest hopes, and the other their barrenness—that bespoke the enlightenment’s doom. Sinophiles believed that the needs of the

Open access

Dmitry V. Arzyutov and Sergei A. Kan

of the field could already be identified. This concept was an interweaving of a significant number of discursive fields, reaching back to the epoch of Enlightenment and deriving elements from the experience of field activities of Vladimir Bogoraz and

Restricted access

Answering Daimã's Question

The Ontogeny of an Anthropological Epistemology in Eighteenth-Century Scotland

Peter Gow

This article seeks to describe the social preconditions of the emergence of science in Scotland since the Enlightenment and what came to be unknown in the process. It addresses the way in which the geologist James Hutton generated a specific category of 'men of scientific observation' as opposed to 'men of common observation'. In doing so, he, like other Enlightenment thinkers, transformed an existing spatial ordering of social relations into a temporal one. This formed one of the early steps in the development of a genuinely anthropological epistemology, whereby knowledge of the human lies with the 'primitive' other and with his or her knowledge of the world. Anthropology is thus the scientific observation of common observation and, as Lévi-Strauss pointed out, a specific form of common observation.

Restricted access

John Carmichael's Journey from Aleppo to Basra (1754)

A Pluralized View of the Enlightenment Discourse of Improvement

Mohammad Sakhnini

This article shows how the Enlightenment notion of improvement in a cross-cultural context cannot be one of constant polarization. Without ever travelling to the Middle East, the Scottish Enlightenment literati proposed that the Middle East is backward and primitive in its economic and material infrastructure. Europe is progressing while the Middle East remained stuck in ancient times. John Carmichael could not escape the European repository of knowledge about the Orient. In his “Journey from Aleppo to Basra” (1754), he sometimes considered Arabs are irrational, backward and primitive. Yet the conditions of traveling in an Arab caravan invited him to interact with the people he encountered. He socialized and exchanged services with the Arabs. At the same time he learned how modern progress needs not be looked at as one of complete banishment of ancient rituals and traditions from the past. The journey in the Middle East has its educational effects.

Restricted access

Thomas Ernst

Reducing human character, characteristics, and behavior to biological conditions of people or specific categories of them has long been an aspect of science, and emerges from The Enlightenment. It is in some senses a part of an heroic attempt to find the cause and effect explanations of everything—to provide consistent explanation of everything from falling stones to the determinates of ‘intelligence’ and criminal minds. These explanations are based in materiality. Gould (1981) provides a good summary of much of this.

Restricted access

Khaled Furani

home. I further select theology as my working term because it is the domain of inquiry from which anthropology, seeking acceptance in Enlightenment thought, explicitly dissociated itself, as we see in Tylor, on the way to becoming a legitimate