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AJEC

Investigating European Cultures, Bridging Disciplines

Gabriela Kiliánová and Tatiana Podolinská

The Anthropological Journal of European Cultures, initiated by German scholar Ina-Maria Greverus together with Christian Giordano in 1990, played a central role in the fundamental changes that the hitherto more or less nationally confined European ethnologies have undergone since then. The journal mediated the intensifying exchange between eastern and western Europe, while its attempt to cross boundaries in particular between an anthropology of Europe and European ethnology remains key.

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Ullrich Kockel

As I settle down to put together this issue, it occurs to me that the development of AJEC in its various phases displays an uncanny correspondence with my personal professional trajectory so far. Its inception and first volume happened during my postdoctoral fellowship when I was happy to place one of my first (coauthored) academic articles in its inaugural issue. The remainder of AJEC’s first approximate decade coincides with my time as a lecturer. At the time I took up my first chair, the format of AJEC changed, eventually turning it, for a while, into a Yearbook rather than a journal. And in the year I moved to my second chair, I was invited to take on the editorship of AJEC, which would now be published by Berghahn and returning to the format of two issues per year. This correspondence raises a curious question: What significant turning point for the journal will correspond with my own as I am becoming an emeritus professor?

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Land Reclamations

Boundary Work as Production of Disciplinary Uniqueness

Klaus Schriewer

anthropology was a discipline without significant theoretical tools for the new chosen object, the so-called complex societies. Moreover, it was a discipline that arrogantly ignored the other discipline, European ethnology, which was already researching these

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Stefan Groth

Language and its relation to culture has been a topic of research in German Volkskunde [folklore studies] from the beginning of the discipline. While dialectological studies, linguistic specificities of local cultures and language in everyday life have been integral parts of Volkskunde for much of the first part of the twentieth century, the discipline saw a shift away from its philological elements towards a social science orientation in post-Second World War developments. During the last decades, the analysis of linguistic dimensions of everyday culture has been on the margin of scholarly activities in Volkskunde. Starting with a historic perspective on the role of language in the beginnings of the discipline, this article discusses the development and decrease of the study of linguistic aspects. It analyses the role of language in contemporary German Volkskunde both in theory and methodology, and offers perspectives on how the discipline could benefit from a renewed focus on linguistic dimensions of everyday culture.

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Putting the Folk in Their Place

Tradition, Ecology and the Public Role of Ethnology

Ullrich Kockel

The folk, who have been exorcised from contemporary academic concern, are now replaced with the populace. Simultaneously, places as ecological loci of meaning and social relations have been discarded in favour of globalised spaces. Arguably, the contemporary obsession with proving the inauthenticity of tradition is itself an essentialising discourse. This obsession has helped destroy places and their ecological relationships. European ethnology originated in the Enlightenment pursuit of good governance and social improvement, which rendered it an instrument of political control - putting the folk in their place. By critically reconstructing the public role of ethnology, we can redirect the ethnological searchlight. Should not the responsible ethnologist, rather than colluding in evictions of the folk from their place, cultivate a respectfully critical understanding of social, economic, political and ecological contexts, working with the folk reflexively, to help reclaim their place.

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Tübingen — Vienna — Münster

Introducing Elisabeth Timm

Elisabeth Timm

European Ethnology. There I took up approaches from the new kinship studies from social anthropology and from the new history of kinship and began my research on popular genealogy in Austria as it emerged there since the nineteenth century. For this project

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Masculinity on Stage

Dueling in the Greek Capital, 1870–1918

Dimitra Vassiliadou

European Ethnology 21 (1991): 5–19; Ute Frevert, “Male Crime in Nineteenth Century Germany: Duelling,” in Gender and Crime in Modern Europe , ed. Margaret L. Arnot and Conelie Usborne (London: Routledge, 1999), 173–188, here 176–180. 2 The relevant

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Ambiguous Attachments and Industrious Nostalgias

Heritage Narratives of Russian Old Believers in Romania

Cristina Clopot

. Mathisen (eds), Folklore, Heritage Politics and Ethnic Diversity ( Botkyrka, Sweden : Multicultural Centre ), 37 – 54 . Bendix , R. ( 2008 ), ‘ Expressive Resources: Knowledge, Agency and European Ethnology ’, Anthropological Journal of European

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European Anthropology as a Fortuitous Accident?

Reflections on the Sustainability of the Field

Čarna Brković

Petnica Science Center near Valjevo, Serbia. The main goal was to discuss methodological and epistemological similarities and differences between Anglo-Saxon anthropologies and Eastern European ethnologies. More specifically, the focus was on similarities

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Forum Introduction

Anthropological Boundaries at Work

Francisco Martínez

traditions in Europe as well as the interconnections between folklore, European ethnology and the anthropology of Europe, Klaus criticises the boundary-work done to export social anthropology over the existing Western traditions. Other scholars engaging in