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Joan Gross

Studying abroad can be a life-altering experience, but not necessarily. I credit the two study-abroad experiences I had as an undergraduate as setting my course as an anthropologist. At this stage in my career, having directed, taught and evaluated five study-abroad programmes in three different countries, I felt ready to create my own based on the pros and cons I had observed. In December 2013, I completed a pilot run of a binational learning community focused on food, culture and social justice in Ecuador and Oregon and would like to share the experience in order to encourage other higher education teachers to invent similar programmes. It is not an easy model to pull off, especially in a large state institution, but it achieved the kind of coherence that I have found lacking in other study-abroad programmes and was a very satisfying teaching/learning experience. I will outline some issues concerning study-abroad programmes and then describe

the programme I was involved in implementing in 2013.

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Marjorie Harness Goodwin

Making use of videotaped interactions of lunchtime conversations among multi-ethnic preadolescent peers (based on three years of fieldwork in LA) this ethnographically based study investigates the embodied language practices through which girls construct friendship alliances as well as relationships of power and exclusion. Girls display “best friend” relations not only through roles they select in dramatic play, such as twins married to twins in “house,” but also through embraces and celebratory handclaps that affirm alliances. Older (sixth grade) girls assert their power with respect to younger fourth grade girls through intrusive activities such as grabbing food from lunchboxes, insults, and instigating gossip; younger girls boldly resist such actions through fully embodied stances. Relations of exclusion are visible not only in seating arrangements of a marginalized “tagalong” girl with respect to the friendship clique, but also highlighted in the ways she is differentially treated when an implicit social norm is violated.

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Fatuma Chege, Lucy Maina, Claudia Mitchell, and Margot Rothman

According to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (article 27) every child has the right to a standard of living adequate for the realization of her or his physical, mental, spiritual, moral and social development. Adequate housing, food and clothing underpin the adequacy of a child’s standard of living. UNICEF estimated nearly ten years ago that one out of every three children, or 640 million children around the world, live in inadequate housing (Bellamy: 2005). Despite this commitment to child rights, little appears to be documented on the safety and security of children with regard to housing generally, and, more specifically, housing in slums or informal settlements: urban growth in the Global South is set to be virtually synonymous with the expansion of slums and informal settlements, and, seven years ago, there were 199 million slum dwellers in Africa alone (Tibajuka 2007). It is impossible, then, to address violence against children and the related issues of child protection, without taking into account the importance of adequate housing, and the significance of what goes on inside houses: the inclusion of the voices of children themselves, currently woefully unheard, is critical.

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Sarah E. Whitney

inspirational personality ( Davis 2016 ; Decaille 2017 ; Holloway 2017 ). While in office, Michelle Obama led a Let Girls Learn 5 initiative, blending diplomatic outreach, skills training, food assistance, and local programs offering alternatives to child

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

how two projects based on indirect cultural exchanges of food, stories and performances between humanities students, cultural organisations and local residents grew out of a dinner-table conversation between friends. These projects provided both a

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Mercedes González de la Rocha and Agustín Escobar Latapí

, the household was enrolled in the PROGRESA 2 program. This meant that her mother received a bi-monthly grant that had to be devoted to Martina’s education, in addition to a food transfer for the entire family. Admittedly, it was a small school grant

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“Like Alice, I was Brave”

The Girl in the Text in Olemaun’s Residential School Narratives

Roxanne Harde

their histories, traditions, and cultures; inadequate food and poor education; and violence and suffering. In each narrative, the author counters these colonial oppressions with the child protagonist’s methods of resistance. Sterling’s personal

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Jingyi Li

produced by various agencies. Some foreign cultural elements such as costumes, food, and sports were added to the teaching materials. Most existing research about communicative English teaching in China focuses on challenges to pedagogy 15 and curriculum

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Teaching globalisation in the social sciences

The effectiveness of a refugee simulation

Stacy Keogh George

as festivals or multicultural food fairs; to take elective courses in other departments with a global or cross-cultural focus; to learn another language; and to study abroad ( Pike et al. 2017 ). Mansilla and Gardner argue that, ‘to thrive in a

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Holding Up Half the Sky

Global Narratives of Girls at Risk and Celebrity Philanthropy

Angharad Valdivia

interventions, such as insisting a local kiosk vendor be asked about purchases. Olivia Wilde looks on as the vendor replies that men buy soda for themselves, and women buy yogurt and other food to feed their families. Indeed, Kristof is the most prominent