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Evert Van de Vliert

.356 Ethiopia −0.368 −2.118 −3.120 −1.218 Finland 1.525 1.242 0.710 1.840 France 0.536 1.268 0.818 1.282 Georgia 0.106 −1.100 −1.456 −1.142 Germany 0.923 1.275 0.856 1.092 Ghana −1.228 −1.157 −1.397 0.419 Greece −0.282 0.921 0.100 0.660 Guatemala −0.841 −0

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Heli Saarikoski and Kaisa Raitio

This article illustrates the interconnectedness of science and politics through a case study of old-growth forest conflict in Finnish Upper Lapland. It demonstrates the ways in which “traditional science“ has failed to settle the decades-long conflict between state forestry and traditional Sámi reindeer herding, and discusses the potential of democratization of science through more inclusive forms of knowledge production. The analysis, which is based on qualitative interview data, shows that a traditional science focus on biological indicators and mathematical modeling has provided only a partial account of the reindeer herding-forestry interactions by ignoring the local, place-specific practices that are equally important in understanding the overall quality of pasture conditions in Upper Lapland. It concludes that an inclusive inquiry, structured according to the principles of joint fact-finding, could create a more policy-relevant, and also more scientifically robust, knowledge basis for future forest management and policy decisions.

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Jaime Moreno Tejada

mushrooms grow. Between 2004 and 2011, Tsing, an anthropologist, visited matsukake-friendly soil in the United States, Japan, Canada, China, and Finland. Matsukake is the most valuable mushroom in the world, a delicacy in Japanese cuisine. It is gathered by

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Bret Gustafson, Francesco Carpanini, Martin Kalb, James Giblin, Sarah Besky, Patrick Gallagher, Andrew Curley, Jen Gobby, and Ryan Anderson

readers on his travels across many continents and tells the stories of his time spent with six Indigenous communities on their territories: the Skolt Sami in northern Finland; the Nenets on the Yamal Peninsula of Russia; the Altai the Golden Mountains in

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Karen Hébert, Joshua Mullenite, Alka Sabharwal, David Kneas, Irena Leisbet Ceridwen Connon, Peter van Dommelen, Cameron Hu, Brittney Hammons, and Natasha Zaretsky

, though its vignettes are shorter, the snapshots more wide-ranging, and the pace among them brisker. Traveling along the rhizome takes Tsing to far-flung spots over the course of the book: Japanese economic history, Finnish forestry, the science of the

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Jens Martens

Kapuscinski Development Lecture/Keynote Address of the 2014 Conference of the Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC) University of Helsinki, Finland, 29 October 2014.

“Post-2015” is the “flavor of the day”; it is currently right in the center of the development discourse. The United Nations, governments, civil society organizations, researchers, and even business people are currently discussing what will come aft er the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). As you all know, the reference period for the MDGs will expire in 2015, and this is the reason why the world community is now engaged in the task of formulating an agenda for the following period. But this Post-2015 Agenda can and must be much more than just an updated list of MDGs.

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Fostering peace through dialogue

The international social democratic movement and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Pentti Väänänen

The Socialist International (SI), the worldwide forum of the socialist, social democratic, and labor parties, actively looked for a solution to the Jewish-Palestinian conflict in the 1980s. At that time, the Israeli Labour Party still was the leading political force in Israel, as it had been historically since the foundation of the country. The Labour Party was also an active member of the SI. The Party’s leader, Shimon Peres, was one of its vice-presidents. At the same time, the social democratic parties were the leading political force in Western Europe. Several important European leaders, many of them presidents and prime ministers, were involved in the SI’s work. They included personalities such as Willy Brandt of Germany; former president of the SI, Francois Mitterrand of France; James Callaghan of Great Britain; Bruno Kreisky of Austria; Bettini Craxi of Italy; Felipe Gonzalez of Spain; Mario Soares of Portugal; Joop de Uyl of the Netherlands; Olof Palme of Sweden; Kalevi Sorsa of Finland; Anker Jörgensen of Denmark; and Gro Harlem Brudtland of Norway—all of whom are former vice-presidents of the SI. As a result, in the 1980s, the SI in many ways represented Europe in global affairs, despite the existence of the European Community (which did not yet have well-defined common foreign policy objectives).

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Regional and sub-regional effects on development policies

The Benelux and the Nordic countries compared

Lauri Siitonen

, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia). So far, however, two older and more institutionalized sub-regional schemes have proven to be more successful: the Benelux group (Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands) and the Nordic group (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway

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development aid. This article compares the Europeanization of development cooperation with sub-regional traditions amongst the Benelux countries (Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg) and the Nordic states (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). The article

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Regional integration from “below” in West Africa

A study of transboundary town-twinning of Idiroko (Nigeria) and Igolo (Benin)

Olukayode A. Faleye

Haparanda, Imatra and Svetogorsk, Narva and Ivangorod, and Valga and Valka. The need for a border market at the Swedish side of the Finnish–Swedish borderland has stimulated the evolution of Haparanda side by side with Tornio. The town of Tornio was