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“Comrades in Battle”

Women Workers and the 1906 Finnish Suffrage Victory

Eric Blanc

In 1906, Finland became the world’s first nation to grant full female suffrage. 1 A pivotal role in winning this watershed achievement was played by the League of Working Women in alliance with the Social Democratic Party (SDP). In this article I

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Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

Two of the earliest women's suffrage victories were achieved in the Russian Empire, in Finland and Russia, as a result of wars and revolutions. Their significance has been largely ignored, yet study of these achievements challenges the standard paradigms about the conditions (struggle within a democracy, geographic location on the 'periphery'), which favoured early suffrage breakthroughs. This article analyses the particular circumstances in Finland and Russia, which, in a relatively short amount of time, broke down resistance to giving women the vote. An examination of the events surrounding the February 1917 Russian Revolution, which toppled the Tsar, demonstrates the significant role of women in initiating and furthering the revolutionary momentum as well as fighting for their own rights. Both the Finns and the Russians pioneered in extending the legacies of the French and American Revolutions to include women.

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Raili Marling

. We welcome Francisca to our Editorial Board. The articles in this volume of Aspasia cover a wide range of topics. Two articles tackle different meanings of revolution. Eric Blanc provides a fresh look at the Finnish suffrage struggle and

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Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

, citing “retarded modernization,” the traditionalism of the peasant majority, and lack of urbanization, does not explain how in neighboring Finland the peasant majority was a critical element in that country’s pioneering women’s suffrage victory in 1906

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Johanna Gehmacher, Svetla Baloutzova, Orlin Sabev, Nezihe Bilhan, Tsvetelin Stepanov, Evgenia Kalinova, Zorana Antonijevic, Alexandra Ghit, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Ana Luleva, Barbara Klich-Kluczewska, Courtney Doucette, Katarzyna Stańczak-Wiślicz, Valentina Mitkova, Vjollca Krasniqi, Pepka Boyadjieva, Marina Hughson, and Rayna Gavrilova

largely remain an underexplored field in history and the social sciences, begging for further explication. Hence the fourteen essays, authored by an international academic team of Russian, Swedish, Finnish, and Lithuanian researchers, set forth to explore

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“The 1990s Wasn't Just a Time of Bandits; We Feminists Were Also Making Mischief!”

Celebrating Twenty Years of Feminist Enlightenment Projects in Tver’

Julie Hemment and Valentina Uspenskaya

( obshchestvennaia organizatsiia ). This was partly due to your reluctance to professionalize your activism, or “NGO-ize” it, but there were strategic benefits to this, of course (I just read an interesting analysis by Finnish scholar Inna Perheentupa, who identifies