Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items for :

  • Gender Studies x
  • Media Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Doing Her Bit

German and Anglo-American Girls' Literature of the First World War

Jennifer Redmann

This article examines sixteen works of girls' literature published in Germany, Great Britain, the United States and Canada during or immediately after the First World War. When examined together, these books reveal much about expectations and opportunities for girls at a time when gender roles were in flux. Their overriding message, however, is contradictory, for even as a girl is exhorted to serve her country, her gender places clear limits on what she can achieve.

Free access

Reading Production and Culture

UK Teen Girl Comics from 1955 to 1960

Joan Ormrod

the star, distant but knowable, as the object of the quest. A two-part photographic story comic in Mirabelle (12 September 1959) falls into this category. It begins with Monica and Jan, Mirabelle staff, sent on a trip to Germany to interview Elvis

Free access

Speaking Our Truths, Building Our Strengths

Shaping Indigenous Girlhood Studies

Kirsten Lindquist, Kari-dawn Wuttunee, and Sarah Flicker

Lindquist and Kari-dawn Wuttunee are both council members of the National Indigenous Young Women’s Council (NIYWC). Kirsten is Cree-Métis with Swedish, English, German, and Ukrainian ancestry, and has been with the council since 2013, where she is now coming

Free access

Hope Chest

Demythologizing Girlhood in Kate Bernheimer’s Trilogy

Catriona McAra

Bernheimer’s girl characters live the very fairy tales (Yiddish, German, Russian) they are reading as a critically self-conscious practice. As Bernheimer herself explains, “Reading fairy tales—or writing about them—is, I can assure you, one of the few ways

Free access

From Selfies to Sexting

Tween Girls, Intimacy, and Subjectivities

Antonio García-Gómez

German , 99 – 118 . New York : Continuum . MacDonald , Fiona . 2016 . Childhood and Tween Girl Culture: Family, Media and Locality . London : Palgrave Macmillan . 10.1057/978-1-137-55130-6 Manning , Wendy D. , Peggy C. Giordano , and Monica A

Restricted access

Andrew J. Webber

on Cate Shortland’s 2012 feature Lore , a German-Australian co-production based on Rachel Seiffert’s narrative of the same name from The Dark Room (2001) and shot in Germany, in German, with a German cast. The film, set at the end of World War II

Restricted access

Daisuke Miyao

The process of modernization in Japan appeared as a separation of the senses and remapping of the body, particularly privileging the sense of vision. How did the filmmakers, critics, and novelists in the 1920s and 1930s respond to such a reorganization of the body and the elevation of vision in the context of film culture? How did they formulate a cinematic discourse on remapping the body when the status of cinema was still in flux and its definition was debated? Focusing on cinematic commentary made by different writers, this article tackles these questions. Sato Haruo, Ozu Yasujiro, and Iwasaki Akira questioned the separation of the senses, which was often enforced by state. Inspired by German cinema released in Japan at that time, they explored the notion of the haptic in cinema and problematized the privileged sense of vision in this new visual medium.

Restricted access

Tru Leverette and Barbara Mennel

Bauhaus, the German art-and-design school (1919 to 1933), not only with a focus on bodies but also on gender, sexuality, and everyday life. Leadership moved from founding director, architect Walter Gropius, to Hannes Meyer, and then Ludwig Mies van der

Restricted access

Transitions Within Queer North African Cinema

Nouri Bouzid, Abdellah Taïa, and the Transnational Tourist

Walter S. Temple

trappings of gay sexual tourism, and it is also a symbolic marker of his “Arab” heterosexual masculinity. But in a rather ironic twist, what makes Roufa’s voyage (and future marriage) possible in the first place is the aid of a former male German lover who

Restricted access

Karen Fiss

German legislation.” The second part of the project was the live event Genitals on Trial that took place within the context of the larger exhibition. Visitors to the nGbK were invited to become part of the performance by entering a private recording