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Learning the Elsewhere of ‘Inner Space’

The Affective Pedagogy of Post-Secular Sufi Healing in Germany

Nasima Selim

to bloom That which destroys us This torn apart Undivided earth On which We travel together.   — Rose Ausländer, “ Gemeinsam /Together” Each year, many Inayati Sufis gather for a summer school in a village in northern Germany that

Open access

Politicizing Elsewhere(s)

Negotiating Representations of Neo-Pentecostal Aesthetic Practice in Berlin

Dominik Mattes

to establish branches across the globe, including 15 congregations in Germany, and William Kumuyi eventually became the general superintendent of what is claimed to be one of the largest churches in the world ( Akoda 2012: 403) . The group in Berlin

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Introduction

Elsewhere Affects and the Politics of Engagement across Religious Life-Worlds

Omar Kasmani, Nasima Selim, Hansjörg Dilger, and Dominik Mattes

(German: unheimlich, bordering on the unfamiliar) enjoys a renewed popularity in the anthropology of religion ( Goslinga 2012 ; Morgain 2012 ), in examining “the frightening … that ought to have remained … secret and hidden but has come to light

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Afterword

The Elsewhere beyond Religious Concerns

Annalisa Butticci and Amira Mittermaier

to step outside of the silos we have come to call ‘anthropology of Islam’ and ‘anthropology of Christianity ’. The articles take us to Germany, Lebanon, Norway, and Iran. Each tells a very particular story of engagements with the Elsewhere (or

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Portrait

Talal Asad

Talal Asad, Jonathan Boyarin, Nadia Fadil, Hussein Ali Agrama, Donovan O. Schaefer, and Ananda Abeysekara

-only concentration camp, and my mother was interned three years later in a family camp. It was there that my father eventually joined us for the remainder of the war. The camp's inmates were largely German speakers, with a sprinkling of Italians. But the labels used

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From the Throes of Anguished Mourning

Shi‘i Ritual Lamentation and the Pious Publics of Lebanon

Fouad Gehad Marei

by a fellowship of the German Orient-Institut in Beirut (OIB). Notes 1 I use ‘Shi‘i’, the adjective form derived from Arabic, to denote an attribute of a proper or common noun. This article examines how Shi‘i rituals, beliefs, and experiences

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Michael Carrithers

Seriousness is achieved when a speaker effectively moves the audience according to his or her intentions. But seriousness is fragile and subject to countless vicissitudes, as illustrated in an encounter with the television evangelist Oral Roberts. I interrogate one of the means used to counter such vicissitudes-hyperbole. Hyperbole may include exaggeration and amplification of all kinds, and may be manifest in deeds as well as words. I first follow hyperbole through 9/11 and the competing ideologies of Salafi jihadists and the Bush administration to show how 'absolute metaphors' are enlisted hyperbolically. I examine too how epic narratives are created as a similar form of hyperbole. Finally, I show how sacredness, another allied form of hyperbole, is attributed to the Holocaust in present-day Germany. Throughout I argue, and illustrate, how anthropological writing is of necessity ironic, such that irony is better than 'cultural relativism' as an understanding of the anthropological enterprise.

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Refuge and History

A Critical Reading of a Polemic

Benjamin Thomas White

it is wrong on every level. The 1951 convention emerged from the recognition that interwar efforts to assist displaced populations—not individuals—had failed, most catastrophically for the Jews of Germany. Its definition of “refugee” explicitly

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Migration and Citizenship in “Athens of Crisis”

An Interview with Vice Mayor Lefteris Papagiannakis

Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou and Nina Papachristou

squats with lack of respect for the law and leftist political identification. It’s not like Holland or Germany where there is a culture around squatting. In Germany I was talking to a Social Democrat about the situation with squatters there, and he was

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Finbarr Barry Flood and Jaś Elsner

northern Iraq for several months in 1986. It was crystallized by time spent in Syria in the years following, some of it working on a German-Syrian excavation in Raqqa, now the capital of the Islamic State. On the weekends in Iraq, I traveled from Tell Afar