Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items for :

  • "Hamletism" x
  • Anthropology x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Economic Transitions and Land Ownership

Challenging Traditions among Rural Yezidis in Post-Soviet Armenia

Hamlet Melkumyan and Roman Hovsepyan

The Yezidis of Armenia, traditionally considered transhumant pastoralists, have been changing their economic habits over the past century. Nowadays, they are more engaged in agriculture than they were a century ago. The social and cultural backgrounds of these transformations are discussed, showing the involvement of the treatment of the Armenians and the adaptive character of the Yezidis’ economy. Presently, the Yezidis practise animal breeding and plant cultivation in parallel, using the human resources available in their family. The ongoing transformations in the economy and their engagement in agriculture are challenging the conservative lifestyle of the Yezidi community. Thus, the people who have shifted to the agrarian economy are seen as outsiders in the traditional framework and are perceived to be of low prestige.

Restricted access

Building a House in Nepal

Auspiciousness as a Practice of Emplacement

John Gray

The subject of auspiciousness and inauspiciousness in South Asian society has largely been analyzed as a temporal condition in which there is a harmonious or inharmonious conjunction of people and events in time. In this article, the construction of houses by high-caste people living in a hamlet in Nepal is used to argue for a reconceptualization of auspiciousness and inauspiciousness as practices of emplacement in space and time. The analysis demonstrates how the rituals associated with the various stages of construction ensure the new house's compatibility with its spatial milieu—the soil, the site, the cardinal directions, and the reigning deities, as well as the vital force of the earth. Together with the auspicious timing of each stage of construction and its associated ritual with the owner's horoscope, the result of the building process shows auspiciousness to be a harmonious conjunction of person, place, and time.

Restricted access

The Smell of Death

Theft, Disgust and Ritual Practice in Central Lombok, Indonesia

Kari G. Telle

In this essay I examine a form of stealing that people in rural Sasak communities on the island of Lombok find deeply problematic because of its intimate nature: theft of which they suspect that someone in their own hamlet or village is culpable. In the large village in central Lombok where I have carried out fieldwork, theft that is attributed to a so-called ‘neighbourhood thief’ is said to produce a foul smell (bais) that begins to ooze out from where the theft occurred, enveloping the neighbourhood in a putrid stench.1 This smell is particularly intense when the thief is not caught in the act of stealing, but manages to slip away. In connection with a theft of two heirloom daggers and several pieces of old cloth that occurred one Saturday night in June 2001 and of which a close neighbour soon emerged as a suspect, Bapen Seni, a man who lives nearby, commented in disgust: ‘Now this neighbourhood really stinks [bais gubuk]! The stench is smelled even far away, it cannot be sealed off.’

Open access

Dividing Worlds

Tsunamis, Seawalls, and Ontological Politics in Northeast Japan

Andrew Littlejohn

her situation tried to evacuate by car; others made hurriedly for the valley sides, or climbed on their house's roofs. She escaped by the skin of her teeth, reaching the mountainside bordering her hamlet's valley just ahead of the water. But many

Free access

Emancipation as social equality

Subaltern politics in contemporary India

Indrajit Roy

the commemorations were no longer limited to their hamlet. Even if the actual festivities continued to be physically performed here, loudspeakers carried the festivities into the neighborhoods and homes of the privileged communities whose

Free access

What Is Analysis?

Between Theory, Ethnography, and Method

Martin Holbraad, Sarah Green, Alberto Corsín Jiménez, Veena Das, Nurit Bird-David, Eduardo Kohn, Ghassan Hage, Laura Bear, Hannah Knox, and Bruce Kapferer

followed local horizons of engagement and knowledge. In each hamlet I asked to be taken to another one deeper in the forest. The hamlet in which I finally settled comprised six huts. Their occupants continually visited relatives living in several smaller

Free access

Beyond citizenship

Adivasi and Dalit political pathways in India

Nicolas Jaoul and Alpa Shah

Musahar villagers insisted on celebrating on different dates in different hamlets, is significant of the former’s internalization of state norms through a unified calendar. On the one hand, the attempt “to erase the different dates that prevailed in

Restricted access

Fates Worse Than Death

Destruction and Social Attachment in Timor-Leste

Gabriel Tusinski

nut and betel pepper leaf) from the hamlet surrounding a family’s uma lulik . I argue that these (among other) material practices constitute a mutual entailment of belonging: both the spatially dispersed living and the ever-present dead come to belong

Restricted access

Laurie Kain Hart

by the influx of migrants from a disintegrating Albania and by reanimated tensions with the bordering Republic of Macedonia. Empty hamlets were now not only indexes of a violent past but also shelters exploited by destitute migrants. Rumors of theft

Restricted access

Community Capacity Building

Transforming Amerindian Sociality in Peruvian Amazonia

Christopher Hewlett

small hamlets, spread out in the headwaters of the Sepahua, Inuya, Purus and Yurua Rivers, approximately 150 miles west of the Brazil-Peru border. These hamlets, averaging around fifteen people, were dispersed on small tributaries ( Dole 1998 ), but