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A People between Languages

Toward a Jewish History of Concepts

Guy Miron

The field of modern European Jewish history, as I hope to show, can be of great interest to those who deal with conceptual history in other contexts, just as much as the conceptual historical project may enrich the study of Jewish history. This article illuminates the transformation of the Jewish languages in Eastern Europe-Hebrew and Yiddish-from their complex place in traditional Jewish society to the modern and secular Jewish experience. It presents a few concrete examples for this process during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The article then deals with the adaptation of Central and Western European languages within the internal Jewish discourse in these parts of Europe and presents examples from Germany, France, and Hungary.

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The Conceptual and Anthropological History of Bat Mitzvah

Two Lexical Paths and Two Jewish Identities

Hizky Shoham

: Oxford University Press, 1997). 5 Ferdinand de Saussure, quoted in Ifversen, “About Key Concepts,” 68. 6 Guy Miron, “A People between Languages: Toward a Jewish History of Concepts,” Contributions to the History of Concepts 7, no. 2 (2012): 1–27. 7 On

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“Did You Teach Us to Do Otherwise?”

Young Women in the Tsukunft Youth Movement in Interwar Poland and Their Role Models

Magdalena Kozłowska

] (Varshe, 1930), 34. On Tsukunft and women, see Magdalena Kozłowska, “Brider un Shvester? Women in the Tsukunft Youth Movement in Interwar Poland,” Scripta judaica cracoviensia [Kraków studies in Jewish history] 13 (2015). According to summaries compiled

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Theo Jung, Cristian Roiban, Gregor Feindt, Alexandra Medzibrodszky, Henna-Riikka Pennanen, and Anna Björk

political and cultural environment creates a specific hybridity of East Central European thought that stands out in comparison to other regions. For Jewish history, several chapters carefully reconstruct the rise of anti-Semitism in East Central Europe from