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Rural Poverty in Jordan

Assessment and Characterisation

Mohamed Tarawneh and Abdel Hakim Al Husban

Adopting a qualitative anthropological approach, this report discusses and critiques dominant theoretical currents in the study of poverty and presents a more qualitative analysis of the topic. Through an examination of rural Jordan, new sets of concepts and calculations on poverty - both qualitative and quantitative - have been forged. The research indicates that poverty, as an economic fact, can easily be manipulated and treated as a numerical game. As a social fact, poverty is seen in terms of complex coping strategies that are managed within a framework of social norms.

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Ugly Feelings of Greed

The Misuse of Friendship in Working-Class Amman

Susan MacDougall

Maslaha and ugly feelings ‘The last sun has set on social relations built on love, tolerance, and humanity, after the fire of maslaha has eaten the natural beauty and spiritual values of life’, Jordanian journalist Kawkab Hanhana (2011

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Expat, Local, and Refugee

“Studying Up” the Global Division of Labor and Mobility in the Humanitarian Industry in Jordan

Reem Farah

Introduction Since 2012, over a million Syrians have fled to Jordan, 671,551 of whom are registered refugees ( UNOCHA 2019 ). Due to economic instability and rising unemployment in the country, the incoming demographic was scapegoated for

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Min Al-Mukhayyam’ (‘From the Camp’)

Discourses of Difference and the Boundaries of Exile amongst Palestinian Refugees in Jordan

Michael Pérez

of East Amman with a high concentration of Palestinian families like his. Asad lacked formal refugee status and had never lived in a refugee camp. 2 Since his parents arrived in Jordan, they have been able to find housing in Amman's neighbourhoods

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Cutting the Face

Kinship, State and Social Media Conflict in Networked Jordan

Geoffrey Hughes

When conducting research on tribal law in Jordan, it was quite common for me to hear older men (and even tribal judges themselves) counselling me that the time to conduct such research had passed. 1 I became accustomed to elegiac monologues

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Introduction

States of Displacement: Middle Eastern Refugees, Internally Displaced Persons and Asylum Seekers in Global Context

Lucia Volk and Marcia C. Inhorn

registered refugees from Syria currently reside in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon ( UNHCR 3RP Plan 2020 ). The number of unregistered refugees living in neighbouring countries is impossible to know. In contrast, all 27 member states of the European Union (EU

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Emily Stokes-Rees, Blaire M. Moskowitz, Moira Sun, and Jordan Wilson

exhibition is any indication, there are more revelations to be had as the Critical Edition team continues to probe Hunt and Boas's research and collecting and to encourage critical dialogue. Jordan Wilson, New York University Notes 1 See Isaiah

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Paying the Price of War

Narratives of Trauma of Iraqi Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Jordan

Laure Bjawi-Levine

The occupation of Iraq and the ensuing sectarian violence have created an Iraqi refugee community, estimated at 700,000 to 1 million, which Jordan has hosted for several years. Residing for the most part in Amman's low-rent neighbourhoods, many Iraqis have overstayed their visas and live in fear of deportation. Marginalised both economically and socially, and forgotten by the U.S. and the international community, poverty-stricken Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers suffer not only from the traumatic experience of sectarian persecution and their escape from Iraq, but also from the stress and fatigue of their long-lasting transit to nowhere. Their narratives show a profound distress and a struggle for survival that is both psychological and economical, since their (il)legal status as 'guests' denies them the possibility of obtaining work permits.

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Reforming universities in the Middle East

Trends and contestations from Egypt and Jordan

Daniele Cantini

This article addresses the core-periphery nexus by looking at some of the reform packages proposed in the 2000s in these two pivotal countries in the Middle East, Egypt and Jordan, as well as the resistances they generated. These reform packages include internationalisation and privatisation policies, as well as World Bank–sponsored programmes intended to enhance the higher education sector. These programmes are marked by a high degree of isomorphism with global trends: they belong to an unquestioned centre, with peripheries as receiving points of policies elaborated elsewhere. In this article, I examine some of the resistances they were met with in Egypt and Jordan and show how their translations were shaped by the logics of the local contexts so that they were rarely implemented. Looking at post–Arab Spring developments, the article reflects on the continuity of reform packages amidst political turmoil, and the ways in which these reforms are altering or reinforcing processes of peripheralisation.

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William R. Jordan

Environmentalism has made much of the idea of community since Aldo Leopold proposed it as the crucial metaphor defining a healthy relationship between humans and the rest of nature. Community, however, far from being the solution to our environmental problems, is actually just a useful way of framing the problem. How, for example, do you form a working relationship with an ecologically obsolete system that owes nothing to you? The answer: You commit yourself to its restoration, cultivating a studied indifference to your own interests—a practice the author terms "holistic restoration."