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Underground Theater

Theorizing Mobility through Modern Subway Dramas

Sunny Stalter-Pace

This article begins from the premise that modern American drama provides a useful and understudied archive of representations of mobility. It focuses on plays set on the New York City subway, using the performance studies concept of “restored behavior” to understand the way that these plays repeat and heighten the experience of subway riding. Through their repetitions, they make visible the psychological consequences of ridership under the historical and cultural constraints of the interwar period. Elmer Rice's 1929 play The Subway is read as a particularly rich exploration of the consequences of female passenger's presumed passivity and sexualization in this era. The Subway and plays like it enable scholars of mobility to better understand the ways that theatrical texts intervene in cultural conversations about urban transportation.

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Black Moves

Moments in the History of African-American Masculine Mobilities

Tim Cresswell

out of sync with the general demographics of New York City. In 2011, for instance, “While black and Latino males between the ages of 14 and 24 account for only 4.7% of the city’s population, they accounted for 41.6% of those stopped.” If we limit the

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“I Want to Ride My Bicycle”

The 11th Annual Bicycle Film Festival

Sønke Myrda

The Bicycle Film Festival (BFF) has grown from a minor grassroots event to a global “Fest” staging urban cycling events in over two dozen cities worldwide. In its 11th year in New York City, the “BFF” New York (June 22–26, 2011) intends to provide its participants with a “weekend full of bike movies, music, art, street party and after parties,”1 before going on tour around the globe. Festival cities include Amsterdam, Athens, Lisbon, London, Los Angeles, Milan, Paris, Sao Paolo, Sydney, Taiwan, Tokyo, Vienna.

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“Illegality,“ health problems, and return migration

Cases from a migrant sending community in Puebla, Mexico

Alison Elizabeth Lee

English abstract: This article examines several cases of undocumented workers who returned to their hometown in Mexico because of unresolved health problems they suffered in the US. Their “illegal“ status complicated the prospect of a full recovery and, therefore, played an important role in their decision to return to Mexico. Access to medical services, the preference to remain invisible to the state, demanding and dangerous working conditions, lack of worker benefits, low pay and separation from family members were important factors contributing to their health problems. Interviews with migrants highlight the contradictions between full integration into the exploitative economic system and exclusion from health care. Data was collected from 2003 to 2005 and from 2011 to 2012 using ethnographic methods and in-depth interviews in a rural town in Mexico and New York City, the principal destination of the migrants from the town.

Spanish abstract: Este artículo examina varios casos de trabajadores indocumentados quienes retornaron a su pueblo natal en México, debido a problemas de salud no resueltos que sufrieron en los Estados Unidos. Su estatus "ilegal" complicó las perspectivas de una completa recuperación y, por lo tanto, jugó un papel importante en su decisión de regresar a México. El acceso a los servicios médicos, la preferencia de permanecer invisibles para el Estado, las exigentes y peligrosas condiciones de trabajo, la falta de beneficios laborales, los bajos salarios y la separación de los miembros de la familia, fueron factores importantes que contribuyeron a sus problemas de salud. Las entrevistas con los migrantes destacan las contradicciones entre la plena integración en el sistema de explotación económica y la exclusión de la atención sanitaria. Se recogieron datos de 2003 a 2005 y desde 2011 hasta 2012 usando métodos etnográficos y entrevistas en profundidad en un pueblo rural en México y en la ciudad de Nueva York, el principal destino de los migrantes.

French abstract: Cet article examine le cas de plusieurs travailleurs sans papiers forcés de retourner dans leur village natal au Mexique en raison des problèmes de santé subis et qu'ils n'ont pas pu résoudre aux États-Unis. Leur statut «illégal» a compliqué la perspective d'un rétablissement complet et a par conséquent joué un rôle important dans leur décision de retourner au Mexique. Le non accès aux services médicaux, le souci constant de rester invisible face aux autorités locales, les conditions de travail exigeantes et dangereuses, l'impossibilité d'avoir accès aux avantages sociaux traditionnellement réservés aux travailleurs, les salaires bas, ainsi que la séparation d'avec les membres de leur famille sont autant de facteurs qui contribuent à leurs problèmes de santé ou à l'aggravation de ceux-ci. Les entretiens menés avec les migrants, me ent en évidence les contradictions entre l'intégration complète dans le système d'exploitation économique et de l'exclusion aux soins de santé. Les données présentées dans ce e analyse, ont été recueillies de 2003 à 2005 et de 2011 à 2012 en utilisant des méthodes ethnographiques et des entrevues en profondeur dans un village rural au Mexique et à New York, principale destination des migrants en provenance de ce e zone.

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Mobilizing a “Spiritual Geography”

The Art and Child Artists of the Carrolup Native School and Settlement, Western Australia

Ellen Percy Kraly and Ezzard Flowers

World Gallery in New York City, had purchased the collection from Rutter in 1956. Mayer likely showed some works in his 1962 exhibition of international children’s art. He donated many works to Colgate, including boxes of Carrolup artwork, labeled

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Patti Tamara Lenard and Laura Madokoro

cities, states, and so on. In such cases, sanctuary is often defined in the negative. For instance, New York City's sanctuary legislation, establishes that “no New York City resources can be used for federal immigration enforcement purposes” ( Espinal

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Ten Years of Transfers

Mobility Studies and Social Change during a Pandemic

Mimi Sheller

as of late April 2020, at the height of social distancing, indicated steep reductions in public transit, but a continuing need for “skeleton” essential services to be maintained. In April 2020, for example, New York City's Metropolitan Transit

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James Longhurst, Sheila Dwyer, John Lennon, Zhenhua Chen, Rudi Volti, Gopalan Balachandran, Katarina Gephardt, Mathieu Flonneau, Kyle Shelton, and Fiona Wilkie

and material feat that produced a type of rail system very different from Belgium’s European and U.S. counterparts. Stephan Hohne’s excellent cultural history of New York City’s “subway map wars” of the 1970s explicates how visual representations of

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Eirini Kasioumi, Anna Plyushteva, Talya Zemach-Bersin, Kathleen F. Oswald, Molly Sauter, Alexandra Ganser, Mustafa Ahmed Khan, Natasha Raheja, Harry Oosterhuis, and Benjamin Fraser

pseudonymous Downtown School, a highly lauded, philanthropically funded middle and high school in New York City. Billed as a “school for digital kids,” the Downtown School had an ambitious, progressive plan to teach an “innovative” curriculum that pushed “what

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Sanctuary in Countries of Origin

A Transnational Perspective

Alexandra Délano Alonso

Mexico City and New York City between 2016 and 2020. It has also been informed by conversations with the organizations, activists, scholars, and government officials mentioned here, as well as my participation as a member of the Sanctuary Working Group at