Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • "New Orleans" x
  • French Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ronald Aronson, Ronald E. Santoni, and Robert Stone

I would like to shift the question. I don’t think the important question is what Sartre would say after September 11, but rather, “What should we say about Sartre after September 11?”

Free access

Following is a minimally edited transcript of a session on Sartre and terrorism from the North American Sartre Society meeting at Loyola University in New Orleans, March 2002. I organized the session as a response to the events of September 11, 2001. Initially at a loss to comprehend what occurred, I decided that this was exactly the kind of event that called for philosophical consideration. The attacks stunned me both in terms of the numbers of dead (I remember that morning hearing estimates of a possible 20,000 dead, now deter- mined to be just over 2,700) and perhaps even more because of the means used and the symbolic and cultural significance of the targets.

Restricted access

Les journaux francophones au dix-neuviéme siécle

Entre enjeux locaux et perspective globale

Guillaume Pinson

Abstract

This article discusses the circulation of francophone news, information, and literary content between Western Europe and North America in the nineteenth century. During this period, big metropolitan cities (Paris, Brussels, Montreal, New Orleans) were forming a dense media network. For the western Atlantic region, New York City and the Courrier des États-Unis (1828–1938) served as the hub of this network. Francophone readers on both sides of the Atlantic shared a large common corpus, including works such as Eugène Sue’s Mystères de Paris (1842–1843), which was distributed in North America by the literary supplement of the Courrier. By providing a general overview of this French-speaking network, this article invites scholars to explore how texts, and literature in particular, operated through an interlinked dynamic system of publication rather than as independent unconnected works.

Restricted access

Does the City of Ends Correspond to a Classless Society?

A New Idea of Democracy in Sartre's Hope Now

Maria Russo

University Press, 2003), 86–87. See also Ronald Aronson, Ronald E. Santoni and Robert Stone, ‘The New Orleans Session – March 2002’, Sartre Studies International 9, no. 2 (2003): 9–25; Matthew C. Eshleman, ‘Is Violence Necessarily in Bad Faith?’ Sartre

Restricted access

Counter-Violence and Islamic Terrorism

Is Liberation without Freedom Possible?

Maria Russo

New Orleans Session – March 2002’, Sartre Studies International 9, no. 2 (2003): 9–25, here 9. It is true that for Sartre ‘Violence by the oppressed is positive because it is a rupture with oppression. It is the birth of humanity, the beginning of

Restricted access

Outrageous Flirtation, Repressed Flirtation, and the Gallic Singularity

Alexis de Tocqueville's Comparative Views on Women and Marriage in France and the United States

Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

Canada from New York in the east to Michigan in the west and from Quebec in the north to New Orleans in the south. Shortly after they returned to France in 1832 and coauthored their report On the Penitentiary System in 1833, Alexis de Tocqueville