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Robert L. Paquette

Most historians, even specialists in the field of slavery, know little about the largest and bloodiest slave insurrection in United States history. The revolt broke out in a sugar-producing region in the Territory of Orleans in 1811, one year before Louisiana's statehood. A disciplined army of rebels composed of men and women, African-born slaves and creole slaves, mulattoes and blacks, skilled slaves and field hands, marched down the east bank of the Mississippi River in quickstep toward New Orleans. Stunned eyewitnesses observe slaves in military formation with drums beating and flags waving. At least some of the leaders of the revolt were uniformed, mounted on horseback, and wielded rearms. Charles, a mulatto slave driver allegedly from Saint-Domingue (Haiti), led the uprising. The 1811 insurrection raises big questions about the causes and content of slave rebellion. Why did the insurrection break out when and where it did? How were slaves of different types from different plantations mobilized to revolt? Was the Louisiana insurrection influenced by the slave revolution in Saint-Domingue? Or were the causes of the revolt local? Why did free-people of color assist whites in suppressing the movement? What were the goals of the rebels? Summary justice led to the grisly executions and mutilations of scores of slaves. Did torture and terror have the desired results for the master class?

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Les journaux francophones au dix-neuviéme siécle

Entre enjeux locaux et perspective globale

Guillaume Pinson

Abstract

This article discusses the circulation of francophone news, information, and literary content between Western Europe and North America in the nineteenth century. During this period, big metropolitan cities (Paris, Brussels, Montreal, New Orleans) were forming a dense media network. For the western Atlantic region, New York City and the Courrier des États-Unis (1828–1938) served as the hub of this network. Francophone readers on both sides of the Atlantic shared a large common corpus, including works such as Eugène Sue’s Mystères de Paris (1842–1843), which was distributed in North America by the literary supplement of the Courrier. By providing a general overview of this French-speaking network, this article invites scholars to explore how texts, and literature in particular, operated through an interlinked dynamic system of publication rather than as independent unconnected works.

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Embodied Vibrations

Disastrous Mobilities in Relocation from the Christchurch Earthquakes, Aotearoa New Zealand

Gail Adams-Hutcheson

evacuation capabilities (or not) of New Orleans residents in the Ninth Ward and beyond. 18 The why and who moved in the wake of the earthquakes and aftershocks in Christchurch have been examined, as well as how people spoke about the relocation

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Black Moves

Moments in the History of African-American Masculine Mobilities

Tim Cresswell

Migration” north to cities such as Chicago. 7 More recently, issues of race and mobility came to a head during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina when black residents of New Orleans were first trapped and then forcibly dispersed. 8 All kinds of mobilities

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Becoming “Pacific-Minded”

Australian Middlebrow Writers in the 1940s and the Mobility of Texts

Anna Johnston

loss we’d be. Britain has never realised that. We must call Americans here.” 13 In May 1944, Hill reported on her fan mail: “I get letters from all over U.S.A., from Seattle to New Orleans, and from American servicemen in the Pacific.” 14 Hill’s ASE

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Beth Gutelius, Janet Gibson, Dhan Zunino Singh, Steven J. Gold, Alexandra Portmann, Peter Cox, Rudi Volti, Adrian Drummond-Cole, and Steven D. Spalding

petrochemicals in the port of New Orleans (150). Her account breaks down simplistic dichotomies to reveal forms of sociality and meaning making between residents and workers along the Mississippi “chemical corridor.” Correspondingly, Satya Savitzsky and John Urry

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Outrageous Flirtation, Repressed Flirtation, and the Gallic Singularity

Alexis de Tocqueville's Comparative Views on Women and Marriage in France and the United States

Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

Canada from New York in the east to Michigan in the west and from Quebec in the north to New Orleans in the south. Shortly after they returned to France in 1832 and coauthored their report On the Penitentiary System in 1833, Alexis de Tocqueville