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Ronald Aronson, Ronald E. Santoni, and Robert Stone

I would like to shift the question. I don’t think the important question is what Sartre would say after September 11, but rather, “What should we say about Sartre after September 11?”

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Following is a minimally edited transcript of a session on Sartre and terrorism from the North American Sartre Society meeting at Loyola University in New Orleans, March 2002. I organized the session as a response to the events of September 11, 2001. Initially at a loss to comprehend what occurred, I decided that this was exactly the kind of event that called for philosophical consideration. The attacks stunned me both in terms of the numbers of dead (I remember that morning hearing estimates of a possible 20,000 dead, now deter- mined to be just over 2,700) and perhaps even more because of the means used and the symbolic and cultural significance of the targets.

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Does the City of Ends Correspond to a Classless Society?

A New Idea of Democracy in Sartre's Hope Now

Maria Russo

University Press, 2003), 86–87. See also Ronald Aronson, Ronald E. Santoni and Robert Stone, ‘The New Orleans Session – March 2002’, Sartre Studies International 9, no. 2 (2003): 9–25; Matthew C. Eshleman, ‘Is Violence Necessarily in Bad Faith?’ Sartre

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Counter-Violence and Islamic Terrorism

Is Liberation without Freedom Possible?

Maria Russo

New Orleans Session – March 2002’, Sartre Studies International 9, no. 2 (2003): 9–25, here 9. It is true that for Sartre ‘Violence by the oppressed is positive because it is a rupture with oppression. It is the birth of humanity, the beginning of