Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Othello in Oman

Aḥmad al-Izkī’s Fusion of Shakespeare and Classical Arab Epic

Katherine Hennessey

All present gave a shout [in praise of her beauty], while the malicious and ill-natured cried aloud, ‘What a pity that one so beautiful and fair should be wedded to one so black!’ 1 Shakespeare opts not to stage the wedding of Othello and Desdemona

Restricted access

Othello, Original Practices

A Photographic Essay

Rob Conkie

In October 2013 I directed an ‘original-ish practices’ staged reading of Othello . What follows is a photographic documentation of that event with occasional annotations. What did ‘original practices’ mean in this context (La Trobe University

Restricted access

‘Shakespeare Had the Passion of an Arab’

The Appropriation of Shakespeare in Fadia Faqir’s Willow Trees Don’t Weep

Hussein A. Alhawamdeh

This article traces William Shakespeare’s echo in Willow Trees Don’t Weep (2014) by Fadia Faqir, a Jordanian/British novelist, to examine the function of Faqir’s appropriation of Shakespeare’s Othello (1604) and Cymbeline (1611) in creating

Restricted access

Rowan Mackenzie

Lefebvre describes how ‘space is lived not represented (or conceived)’ in the context of his spatial triad of perceived, conceived and lived spaces. This article focuses on the extent to which Shakespeare can enable those who feel imprisoned (whether literally or through social, mental, physical or economic constraints) to expand the space in which they exist. Drawing on the work of Lefebvre and Foucault in their consideration of spatial creation, manipulation and alteration by the social experiences within it, I develop on these theories to focus specifically on the use of Shakespeare’s plays to evolve these, often constraining, spaces into somewhere that gives the participants the freedom and space to explore alternatives to their previous experiences of life. This article considers the impact of using Shakespeare as a method of creating space for a group of men in Leicester Prison as part of their 2017 Talent Unlocked Arts Festival.

Restricted access

Shakespeare’s Orientalism Revisited

A Postcolonial Study of the Appropriation of Arabic/Islamic Allusions and Matters in the Bard’s Oeuvre

Mahmoud F. Al-Shetawi

(‘one tree’, ‘sole tree’) match: both connote the same meaning, a unique and far-fetched object that is characteristically Oriental. Again in Othello , Shakespeare uses the Arabian tree to associate his hero with the Orient: Othello's ‘subdu'd eyes

Restricted access

Going Rogue

Bianca at Large

Elizabeth Mazzola

This article explores how Shakespeare transforms his early picture of female virtue embodied by Bianca Minola – safely stowed in her chambers in The Taming of the Shrew – into the freedom we find in Othello's Bianca, who is an emblem of the larger world; her movements aligned with integrity, the ability to reason, and mastery of her body. I investigate how Bianca's 'nomadic' status guarantees her safety and speech, and also locate her agency and mobility alongside the movements of female characters like Moll Cutpurse, Isabella Whitney's dejected maidservant, and Spenser's Britomart – all guardians of a world to which they only peripherally belong.

Restricted access

The Nature of Gender

Are Juliet, Desdemona and Cordelia to their Fathers as Nature is to Culture?

Gordana Galić Kakkonen and Ana Penjak

This article brings ecofeminist critical thinking to William Shakespeare's female characters: Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, Desdemona in Othello, and Cordelia in King Lear. Beginning with the principal that women and nature are similar in many ways (reproductive function, discrimination, subordination, possession, violence), ecofeminism focuses on the interaction between the two. Ecofeminism grounds its beliefs in the fact that patriarchal domination gets imposed through different binary oppositions including man-woman and culture-nature categories. By applying ecofeminism's positions, the authors will provide a critical thinking of the production of socially imposed inequalities seen through Juliet, Desdemona, and Cordelia. Since out of many different publications on the topic of ecofeminism none has provided such an approach, the authors believe that the article presents an important addition to the literature on both Shakespeare and ecofeminism.

Free access

Edited by Graham Holderness and Bryan Loughrey

commerce (see, e.g., The Comedy of Errors, The Merchant of Venice, Coriolanus, Othello…) . It should therefore come as no surprise that economic themes and motifs rank high among the pressing cultural concerns to which Shakespeare gave shape in his works

Free access

Introduction

Creative Critical Shakespeares

Rob Conkie and Scott Maisano

the subheading of which is A Critical Anthology of Plays from the Seventeenth Century to the Present (emphasis added), and both of which offer trenchant creative critiques of Othello and its afterlives, adaptations here offer similar ripostes to

Restricted access

Scott Maisano

Athens in A Midsummer Night’s Dream . Another Venetian duke appears in Othello , where his role is limited to Act One. The present Duke of Ravenna, by contrast, appears only in Act Five. In another late Elizabethan comedy, Blurt, Master Constable