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Dan Flory

This article modifies philosopher Tamar Szabó Gendler's theory of imaginative resistance in order to make it applicable to film and analyze a distinctively adverse kind of resistant response to James Cameron's Avatar (2009). Gendler's theory, as she states it, seeks to explain resistance to literary stories in a straightforwardly cognitivist, but narrowly rationalistic fashion. This article introduces elements from recent work at the intersection of philosophy of film and the emotions to augment Gendler's theory so that it can be used to explain why some viewers hesitate or even refuse to imagine some cinematic fictional worlds. The method used is analytic philosophy of film. The analysis reveals that some viewers are cognitively impoverished with regard to imagining race in general: they will likely have extreme difficulty in centrally imagining racially "other" characters, which also bodes ill for their real-world prospects for moral engagements concerning race.

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Dan Flory

“All our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy—serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience.” — Ta-Nehisi Coates (2015) One of the more notorious sequences in D. W

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Erin Ash

Media are important sites for examining issues of power and privilege, particularly with regard to race. Beyond instances of specific representations, however, the narrative tropes—or common stories that are told across all types of media

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Stephen Prince

In this issue of Projections , Dan Flory examines issues of race in film from a singular angle. He is interested in understanding how disgust reactions, manifested by viewers in relation to characters and situations, are inflected by racial

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Janet Staiger

internationally, as a conflict based on race; another is the critiques of US militarism/imperialism in the 1960s. Is the classical phase really just one version of the genre available at every historical point? And parody as well? Do actual historical audiences

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Margrethe Bruun Vaage and Gabriella Blasi

and critical race theory to analyze how some of the 2011 Native American Film and Video Festival (NAFVF) films “work to orient indigenous agency and activism” (228). In this context, Monani’s chapter focuses on the figure of the “ecological Indian” as

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Carl Plantinga

Spartans and the bad Persians. Figure 3. A hideous Persian giant roars like a beast before attacking the Spartans ( 300 , Warner Bros., 2007) Both race and sexuality work into this stark differentiation as well, as purity is designated to the

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Brenda Austin-Smith, Matthew Cipa, and Temenuga Trifonova

.g., postcolonial theory, race studies, globalization, gender studies, cultural studies). To her credit, Wheatley acknowledges feminist critiques of the heteronormative, patriarchal slant of Cavell's thought and his complicity in “a particular brand of American

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Guest Editor's Introduction

Phenomenology Encounters Cognitivism

Robert Sinnerbrink

shaping our engagement with (popular) cinema and the manner in which it can serve as a powerful vehicle of ideological influence, especially with regard to key aspects of personal identity (e.g., gender, race, and class). Can cognitivist theories engage

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Before and After Ghostcatching

Animation, Primitivism, and the Choreography of Vitality

Heather Warren-Crow

arts, which embraced primitivism in an attempt to “exorcize the interiorized structures separating [European artists] from the authenticity of their own childhoods and of the childhood of their ‘race’” ( Leighten 2013: 60 ). 4 Primitivism in animation