Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • "SELF-PRESENTATION" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Luna Dolezal

Jean-Paul Sartre's account of the Look in Being and Nothingness is not straightforward and many conflicting interpretations have arisen due to apparent contradictions in Sartre's own writing. The Look, for Sartre, demonstrates how the self gains thematic awareness of the body, forming a public and self-conscious sense of how the body appears to others and, furthermore, illustrates affective and social aspects of embodied being. In this article, I will critically explore Sartre's oft-cited voyeur vignette in order to provide a coherent account of the Look and to illustrate the significance of intersubjectivity and self-consciousness in Sartre's work. Through considering Sartre's voyeur vignette and other examples of reflective self-consciousness, this article will examine epistemological, self-evaluative and ontological concerns in the constitution of reflective self-consciousness. It will be contended that Sartre's accounts of the Look and reflective self-consciousness within social relations can provide insight into the intersubjective nature of the shaping of the body and the significance of self-presentation within the social realm.

Restricted access

Reconsidering Politics as a Man’s World

Images of Male Political Leaders in France and Norway

Anne Krogstad and Aagoth Storvik

Researchers have often pointed to the masculine norms that are integrated into politics. This article explores these norms by studying male images of politics and power in France and Norway from 1945 to 2009. Both dress codes and more general leadership styles are discussed. The article shows changes in political aesthetics in both countries since the Second World War. The most radical break is seen in the way Norwegian male politicians present themselves. The traditional Norwegian leadership ethos of piety, moderation, and inward orientation is still important, but it is not as self-effacing and inelegant as it used to be. However, compared to the leaders in French politics, who still live up to a heroic leadership ideal marked by effortless superiority and seduction, the Norwegian leaders look modest. To explain the differences in political self-presentation and evaluation we argue that cultural repertoires are not only national constructions but also gendered constructions.

Restricted access

Elizabeth Mazzola

print in the grass’. 43 But the gaze of the bride offers Spenser another centre or vantage point. Privileging the spectatorship of the Queen guarantees the poet’s position as England’s Virgil, even while the poet’s self-presentation can at the same time

Restricted access

Sartre, Lacan, and the Ethics of Psychoanalysis

A Defense of Lacanian Responsibility

Blake Scott

Crowell describes it, the fundamental project is “a basic choice of being that expresses itself in all I do as a certain style of self-presentation, a certain pattern of decision-making and responsiveness to the world’s solicitations.” 19 In a similar

Restricted access

John M. Fyler

sinfulness and shame. In the Merchant’s Tale , May’s shamelessness is, if anything, increased after she has enjoyed her “fruit”’. 75 January remains blind, but so does the narrator, despite his self-presentation. In all, he shares the duplicity he ascribes

Restricted access

“Such a Poor Finish”

Illegitimacy, Murder, and War Veterans in England, 1918-1923

Ginger S. Frost

self-presentation that the HO commuted the death penalty to penal servitude for life. How long he served, then, depended on which explanation of his failures the civil servants believed. Crockford’s attempts to gain his freedom showed an evolution in

Restricted access

“Give Me Back My Son!”

Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emotion Talk, and the Gendering of Political Rhetoric

Linda E. Mitchell

returns at the end to her default self-presentation as a prostrate and grieving mother, she precedes this with a final nail in the coffin of her support for the pope. Although not a prophetess or the daughter of a prophet, she has been given knowledge of

Free access

Introduction

‘William Le Queux, Master of Misinformation’

Ailise Bulfin and Harry Wood

for researchers to reach any firm conclusions on his activities or his views. Placed side by side with his self-presentation as mysterious and his tendency to embellish (and even lie about) his achievements, it even suggests the possibility that his

Restricted access

Liesbeth Schoonheim

Kirkpatrick's biography is the ‘becoming’ of Beauvoir, which she primarily (but not exclusively) understands as a form of self-presentation by a public intellectual that strategically anticipates the hostilities faced by women who acquire such visibility. In