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Beyond Metaphor

Corporeal Sociability and the Language of Commerce in Eighteenth-Century Britain and France

Joseph D. Bryan

luxury produced “agreeable sensations,” the pleasurable experience of refined, sociable living. Adam Smith even grounded his understanding of moral sentiments and the sociability necessary in a commercial society on the notion of an impartial spectator, a

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“Sad Era, Villainous Affair“

The Dreyfus Affair in the Notebooks of Henri Vever

Willa Z. Silverman

This article analyzes representations of the Dreyfus Affair in the private diaries written between 1898 and 1901 by Henri Vever, a prominent Art Nouveau jeweler, art collector, and small-town mayor. The important place accorded the Affair in these “ordinary writings“ by an individual with no direct engagement in it offers an opportunity to assess how historical events become enmeshed with private life, mentalités, and sociability. Further, Vever's notebooks reveal position taking during the Affair as a complex phenomenon, in Vever's case influenced by circumstances encompassing his identity as both a native of Lorraine, marked by France's defeat in 1870, and a Republican notable and Parisian businessman. While Vever's notebooks corroborate some standard themes of Dreyfus Affair historiography, including the importance of the press and the eclipsing of the Affair by the 1900 World's Fair, they also nuance the idea of a rigid ideological division between Dreyfusards and anti-Dreyfusards.

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Les Signes du Politique

Language and Sociability in France from the Fourteenth to the Nineteenth Century

Jacques Guilhaumou

This article describes the social and linguistic processes underlying the formation of political language in France from the end of the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. The author emphasizes the close relationship between the evolution of political language, as it can be traced through the many editions of dictionnaires and grammaires, and novel forms of sociability, from the medieval notion of friendship to revolutionary civism. The eighteenth century is considered a crucial moment in this process, given that during that period the thinkers of the Lumières, in their effort to harness civil society through language, forged the notion of a space of universal communication among men as a precondition for the invention of a political language specific to contemporary democracy.

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Jeffrey H. Jackson

By the 1920s, the physical transformation in the urban space of Montmartre led two groups of artists to "secede" from the city of Paris, at least in spirit. Calling themselves the Commune Libre de Montmartre and the République de Montmartre, these painters, illustrators, poets, writers, and musicians articulated a distinctive community-based identity centered around mutual aid, sociability, and limiting urban development. They also reached out to the poor of the neighborhood through charity efforts, thus linking their fates with those of other area residents. Through these organizations, neighborhood artists came to terms with the changes taking place in the city of Paris in the 1920s by navigating between nostalgia and modernism. They sought to keep alive an older vision of the artists' Montmartre while adapting to the new conditions of the post-World War I city.

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James Longhurst, Sheila Dwyer, John Lennon, Zhenhua Chen, Rudi Volti, Gopalan Balachandran, Katarina Gephardt, Mathieu Flonneau, Kyle Shelton, and Fiona Wilkie

debate on Britain’s attempts between the wars to create for its overseas possessions a sustainable naval self-defense. The Best Conference You Never Went To Colin Divall, ed., Cultural Histories of Sociabilities, Spaces and Mobilities (London: Pickering

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Judith A. Nicholson and Mimi Sheller

Sociability in South Africa,” in Cultural Histories of Sociabilities, Spaces and Mobilities , ed. Colin Divall (New York: Routledge, 2015), 39–51. 22 Ibid., 43. 23 McKittrick, Demonic Grounds . 24 Simpson, Trafficking Subjects ; Cresswell, On the Move . 25

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Mobilities and the Multinatural

A Test Case in India

Thomas Birtchnell

Geographers 38, no. 1 (2013): 106–119, doi:10.1111/j.1475–5661.2012.00501.x . 19 Nigel Clark, Inhuman Nature: Sociable Life on a Dynamic Planet (London: Sage, 2010).

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The Algerian Café-Hotel

Hub of the Nationalist Underground, Paris 1926–1962

Neil MacMaster

movements in nineteenth-century France have shown in some detail how, at the micro-level, urban clubs, associations, and chambrées sustained forms of sociability in which a popular radical tradition took root, often hidden away from the eyes of the police

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A Fiction of the French Nation

The Émigré Novel, Nostalgia, and National Identity, 1797–1815

Mary Ashburn Miller

less happy in my exile, for I have not brought the bones of my fathers with me.” 44 In reality, of course, most émigrés were not alone; they established communities of sociability. Famously, Juniper Hall—Fanny Burney’s residence in Surrey

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Jules Vallès and Séverine

Romantic Socialism and the Afterlife of a Cross-Sex Friendship in French Political Culture, 1880–1929

Michael Mulvey

to gossip that Vallès had himself turned “womanly” ( femmelette ). 35 At London tables of fraternal sociability, Vallès envisioned a subversive female rebel putting the Parisian bourgeoisie against the wall. In the tradition of pre-Marxist French