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Florian Krobb

Main Reef Road, South Africa, 1999; Nicolaas Hofmeyr (director and writer); 88 minutes; Free Filmmakers Production

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Race and the Micropolitics of Mobility

Mobile Autoethnography on a South African Bus Service

Bradley Rink

between race, gender, class, safety, and convenience that complicate the South African transportation landscape, as well as the normative discourses of mobility that privilege some practices while restricting others. 1 My bus travel takes place in a

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“It's a Big Umbrella”

Uncertainty, Pentecostalism, and the Integration of Zimbabwe Exemption Permit Immigrants in Johannesburg, South Africa

Tinashe Chimbidzikai

difficult to make long-term plans when you don't know your future in South Africa. … But you know what, I just put everything in God's hands. He [God] brought me here, and He will make a plan for me,” said Nomsa, a 44-year-old working-class single mother

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Julián Antonio Moraga Riquelme, Leslie E. Sponsel, Katrien Pype, Diana Riboli, Ellen Lewin, Marina Pignatelli, Katherine Swancutt, Alejandra Carreño Calderón, Anastasios Panagiotopoulos, Sergio González Varela, Eugenia Roussou, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Miho Ishii, Markus Balkenhol, and Marcelo González Gálvez

.4324/9780203450994_chapter_10 HACKMAN, Melissa, Desire Work: Ex-Gay and Pentecostal Masculinity in South Africa , 216 pp., illustrations, notes, references, index. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018. Paperback, $24.95. ISBN 9781478000822. Gay and lesbian

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Introduction

Elsewhere Affects and the Politics of Engagement across Religious Life-Worlds

Omar Kasmani, Nasima Selim, Hansjörg Dilger, and Dominik Mattes

. Comaroff . 1999 . “ Occult Economies and the Violence of Abstraction: Notes from the South African Postcolony .” American Ethnologist 26 ( 2 ): 279 – 303 . https://doi.org/10.1525/ae.1999.26.2.279 10.1525/ae.1999.26.2.279 Csordas , Thomas J

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An Ethics of Response

Protestant Christians’ Relation with God and Elsewheres

Ingie Hovland

) then gave a lecture on an aspect of the history of Christian mission or on a Bible passage, while the assembled women sat still and listened. Sometimes one of the women read aloud news from female missionaries in Zululand (South Africa), Madagascar

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Portrait

Jean Comaroff

Jean Comaroff, Peter Geschiere, Kamari M. Clarke, and Adeline Masquelier

Colonial frontiers, we have long been told, put conventional categories at risk. I grew up on one such frontier, itself an anachronism in the late-twentieth-century world—apartheid South Africa, where many of the key terms of liberal modernity were scandalously, publically violated. Religion was one of them. Some have argued that the act of separating the sacred from the secular is the founding gesture of liberal modern state making (Asad 2003: 13). In this, South Africa was a flagrant exception. There, the line between faith and politics was always overtly contested, always palpably porous. Faith-based arguments were central to politics at its most pragmatic, to competing claims of sovereignty and citizenship, to debates about the nature of civilization or the content of school curricula. As a settler colony, South Africa had long experimented with ways to ‘modernize racial domination’ (Adam 1971) in the interests of capitalist production, frequently with appeals to theology. After 1948, in contrast with the spirit of a decolonizing world, the country fell under the sway of Afrikaner rulers of overtly Calvinist bent. They set about formalizing a racial division of labor that ensured that black populations, the Children of Ham, remained economically subservient and politically marginal.

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Judith A. Nicholson and Mimi Sheller

practices and micropolitics of race, class, and identity on one South African bus service; and Tamara Vukov examines how mobility becomes racialized at the “smart” border. These articles are linked through their focus on intersections of racial politics and

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Gijs Mom and Georgine Clarsen

-settler countries: the United States, Canada, and South Africa. We hope that the articles, which contribute to the burgeoning literature on mobility, race, and settler colonialism, will inspire more scholars to examine the topic in other cultural contexts and from

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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Juliano Fiori

, South Africa, and Ivory Coast, which host significant numbers of regional migrants and refugees, receive proportionally little attention and support. It is an irony of European containment policies that, while adopted as a measure against supposed