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Robert W. Compton Jr.

The African National Congress and the regeneration of political power, S. Booysen, 2011. Wits University Press.

Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty, D. Acemoglu & J. Robinson, 2012. Crown Publishing (Random House).

A Legacy of Liberation: Thabo Mbeki and the Future of the South African Dream, M. Gevisser, 2009. Palgrave-Macmillan.

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Troubles with Identity

South African Anthropology, 1921–2005

Aleksandar Boskovic and Ilana van Wyk

Anthropology began in South Africa with the work of nineteenth century missionaries like Alexandre Junod (Hammond-Tooke 1997; Thornton 1998) and as such it fits nicely into the cliche´ of a ‘colonial’ science. However, even at its humble beginnings in the former British colony, anthropology was much more than that (Thornton 1983; Cocks 2001); it served as an important field where different points of opinion collided or converged, but also as an important laboratory for different political experiments – some of which had lasting and devastating effects on South African societies.

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Ambassador Dumisani S. Kumalo

Keynote address of the 2011 Conference of the Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC) Rustenburg, South Africa, 30 November 2011

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Robert Compton

Gruzd, S. (Ed.). (2010). Grappling with governance: Perspectives on the African peer review mechanism. Auckland Park, South Africa: Fanele.

Akokpari, J., Ndinga-Muvumba, A., & Murithi, T. (2008). The African Union and its institutions. Auckland Park, South Africa: Fanele.

Ferguson, J. (2006). Global shadows: Africa in the neoliberal world order. Durham: Duke University Press.

Maathai, W. (2009). The challenge for Africa. New York: Pantheon Books.

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Filling in the cracks

Improving on crumbling democratic practices

Victoria Graham

A. Stepan (ed.). (2009). Democracies in danger. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

L. Diamond and M.F. Plattner (eds.). (2009). Democracy: A reader. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

A. Jeeves and G. Cuthbertson (eds.). (2008). Fragile freedom: South African democracy 1994–2004. Pretoria: University of South Africa Press.

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Alexei Elfimov and Ullrich Kockel

As the new century unfolds, it becomes increasingly clear that contexts in which anthropology is practised as an established discipline, scholarly enterprise, applied endeavour, profession and intellectual pursuit keep changing, altering and transforming. The general aim in putting together this collection of essays was to test the state and condition of the relationship between anthropology and society in a number of countries where anthropological discourses and ethnographic activity have had a tangible presence in academia and beyond. Adopting a comparative approach – anthropology’s long-term companion – that we hoped would once again allow us to highlight where things have developed differently and where they seemed the same (or indeed were only equally illusorily), we asked leading practitioners from Austria, Brazil, France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Russia, South Africa and the United States to ponder the same, rather broadly posed, set of questions.

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Round table report

Advancing regional social integration, social protection, and the free movement of people in Southern Africa

Lorenzo Fioramonti

The round table on “Advancing regional social integration, social protection, and free movement of people in Southern Africa” was organized as part of the conference “Regional governance of migration and social policy: Comparing European and African regional integration policies and practices” held at the University of Pretoria (South Africa) on 18–20 April 2012, at which the articles in this special issue were first presented. The discussion was moderated by Prince Mashele of the South African Centre for Politics and Research and the participants included: Yitna Getachew, IOM Regional Representative for Southern Africa, Migration Dialogue for Southern Africa (MIDSA); Jonathan Crush, University of Cape Town and Balsillie School of International Affairs, Canada, representing the Southern Africa Migration Program (SAMP); Vic van Vuuren, Director of Southern African ILO; Vivienne Taylor, South Africa Planning Commission; Sergio Calle Norena, Deputy Regional Representative of UNHCR; Laurent De Boeck, Director, ACP Observatory on Migration, Brussels; Wiseman Magasela, Deputy Director General Social Policy, South African Department of Social Development; and Sanusha Naidu, Open Society Foundation for South Africa.

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Between Scylla and Charybdis

On Colin Shindler’s Respublica Hebraeorum

Arie M. Dubnov

Jerusalem Post , with little chance of attracting any response outside a small captive audience. To his credit, Shindler is not afraid to mention Israel’s contacts with ‘pariah regimes’ (chap. 8)—including apartheid South Africa, Argentina during the

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Menachem Begin’s World Travels in the 1950s

A Road to Political Legitimacy

Ofira Gruweis-Kovalsky

overseas travel as a tool, much like the Italian Communist Party, albeit on a smaller scale. Begin traveled all over the globe, making stops in France, Belgium, the United States, Colombia, Venezuela, Cuba, South Africa, and Rhodesia, among other countries

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Drawing Stereotypes

Europe and East Asia in Russian Political Caricature, 1900–1905

Zachary Hoffman

Britain for its war against Dutch colonists in South Africa, known as Boers. When British forces suffered several early defeats in the conflict, Novoe vremia , together with most other Russian newspapers, cheered their humiliation. 29 S. F. Sokolovskii