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Technologies of Nonviolence

Ethical Participatory Visual Research with Girls

Astrid Treffry-Goatley, Lisa Wiebesiek, Naydene de Lange, and Relebohile Moletsane

Digital and social networking technologies have transformed media production and distribution from an exclusive professional practice to a more organic and interactive peer-to-peer media culture. New participatory visual methods in research often

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Laurel Hart, Pamela Lamb, and Joshua Cader

How might online communities and networked technologies foster nonviolence for girls and young women? Which technologies might generate greater accessibility to knowledge, and communities of support, in order to help girls and young women overcome

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Phil Wood, Paul Warwick, and Derek Cox

Consideration of the physical environment in which learning takes place has become a growing area of academic interest over the past decade. This study focuses on the experiences and perceptions of academic staff and students who used three refurbished, and innovative, learning spaces at the University of Leicester. The results suggest that the physical environment can have an impact on the emotional and motivational experiences of students and staff. However, there is some suggestion that learning space development should not be at the expense of approaches to pedagogy which do not foreground the use of technologies.

The analysis of the users' experiences leads to the proposition of a theoretical model for the apt design of future learning spaces in Higher Education. The DEEP learning space framework outlines the need for careful consideration being given to dynamic, engaging, ecological and participatory (DEEP) dimensions within the twenty-first century learning space.

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Tweens as Technofeminists

Exploring Girlhood Identity in Technology Camp

Jen England and Robert Cannella

Girls’ relationships with digital technologies are often complicated by competing narratives. Girls are told that digital technologies are a gender neutralizer or savior; this is a common argument of 1990s’ cyberfeminism that “celebrated digital

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Asta Vonderau

Drawing upon ethnographic data, this article investigates the effects of a new online campus management system in one of the largest universities in Germany. It shows the various ways in which this technological innovation influenced students', teachers' and administrative personnel's relations and everyday working practices and how it is influential in the reorganisation of university structures. The online management system is regarded as an important part of an emerging infrastructure of excellence, which materialises the changing understanding of qualitative studies and teaching. Findings show that the online management supports standardised and economised study, teaching and administrative practices and silences creativity and flexibility. However, these standardisations are negotiated and questioned by the actors involved.

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My Words, My Literacy

Tracking of and Teaching through the On-Field Language Practices of Australian Indigenous Boys

David Caldwell, Nayia Cominos, and Katie Gloede

language domain of particular interest to Aboriginal boys, the Australian rules sporting field, with the ultimate aim to develop classroom applications for emerging technologies to support twentieth-century literacy skills for these students. In approaching

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“Can You Really See What We Write Online?”

Ethics and Privacy in Digital Research with Girls

Ronda Zelezny-Green

technologies more broadly, and not specifically on cell phones. Making a distinction between children’s cell phone use and their use of other technologies is important since the increasingly personalized and private nature of cell phone appropriation has come

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Joan Njagi

Communication technologies such as social and mobile media are considered useful in contributing to breaking down barriers of access to mainstream media platforms such as TV, radio, and newspapers, thereby increasing social and political

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“For Girls to Feel Safe”

Community Engineering for Sexual Assault Prevention

Day Greenberg and Angela Calabrese Barton

Learning and practice are grounded in historical, physical, and contextual location ( Bright et al. 2013 ). In STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), sociohistorical narratives about who can develop and succeed in these subjects

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Chloe Krystyna Garcia and Ayesha Vemuri

Bock (2012) describes as a technology of nonviolence, serving as ways in which young women and girls identify oppressive structures, persons, myths, and stereotypes that contribute to rape culture, and as tools for warning others. For example, vloggers