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“Like Alice through the Looking Glass”

Claude Lévi-Strauss in New York

Vincent Debaene

What were the significance and the impact, for Claude Lévi-Strauss, of his experience as a refugee in New York between May 1941 and December 1944? If one follows Lévi-Strauss's late reconstructions, his exile appears surprisingly as an almost enchanted experience, marked by various encounters (Roman Jakobson, André Breton, Franz Boas), the first contact with North-West Coast Amerindian art, and the discovery of New York, an almost surrealistic city “where anything seemed possible.” Without contesting such an a posteriori reading, this article shows how such a reconstruction has been made possible through a complex reorganization of a traumatizing past. It then appears that the exile, and its remembrance in later texts, played a pivotal role in the development of Lévi-Strauss's anthropological work to come: his experience as a refugee was at the root of his reinvention of symbolism as well as of his reflections on humanity as a whole.

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Stephen Prince

Digital visual effects bridge art and science in ways that have expanded the expressive tools available to filmmakers. Digital imaging also has enlarged a domain for realism in cinema based on indexical and perceptual factors. Examining these factors, the article questions the visual skepticism that often surrounds discussion of visual effects in film studies. A conjunction of art and science has characterized cinema throughout its history, especially in the era of “philosophical toys” from which the medium originated. The article examines that era in light of what it suggests about digital imaging today and the aesthetic forms that it enables.

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Jacques Samson

This reading of Hergé's Tintin au Tibet uses the notions of 'the daydream' and 'the haunting idea' in order to approach the text not at the level of its plot, but at that of the imaginary that underlies it, whose presence is betrayed through two series of obsessive reiterations and wordplays around the name of Tchang, the lost object of Tintin's quest. A digression via Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass establishes it as an important intertext, prefiguring Hergé's album in a number of ways: the metaphorical function of the chess game and its close association with the state of dreaming or daydreaming, and the way in which the use of language, particularly the proper name, becomes analogous to dreamwork as words exceed their literal meaning and slide along the signifying chain, destabilising meaning and identity. The article then focuses on Tintin au Tibet, demonstrating the key importance of the famous large panel on the second page, in which the word 'Tchang', cried out by Tintin on waking, is substituted by Hergé for any images of the dream itself. The reverberation of the word, and of words resembling it, is tracked through the remainder of the text, along with a more generalised problematic around proper names and a compulsive tendency to repetition, symptoms of an unconscious grappling with the elusiveness and fluctuating nature of self and other, ontological questions that linger after narrative resolution has been achieved.

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Gazing at Medusa

Adaptation as Phallocentric Appropriation in Blue Is the Warmest Color

Marion Krauthaker and Roy Connolly

penetrating blue eye and her elusive yet confident smile introduce her as subject of the look and as a mysterious and self-assured woman. This androgynous depiction goes against representations of female features traditionally associated with rounder shapes

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Play of Mirrors

An Encounter of Personal Biographies with Europe’s Journey

Marcos Farias Ferreira

that meeting in the following terms: a generation facing itself through the looking glass. It is partly the product of retrospection, but when I look back I see young people deeply interested in the other and capable of relating to the other’s loves

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Gamed by the System

Exploring Black Male Youths’ Motivation to Participate in Sports

Deborwah Faulk, Robert A. Bennett III, and James L. Moore III

. Cooley , Charles Horton . 1902 . “ The Looking-Glass Self .” In Social Theory: The Multicultural and Classical Readings ( 3rd ed.), ed. Charles Lemert , 185 . Boulder, CO : Westview Press . Cunningham , Phillip Lamarr . 2009 . “ ‘Please Don

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Searching for the Young Soul Rebels

On Writing, New Wave, and the Ends of Cultural Studies

Richard Langston

then passes through pop songs like “The Look of Love” by abc and Haircut 100’s “Fantastic Day.” Boy George was for Diederichsen no different than Yuri Andropov. Both equally stood for a form of political commitment that rejected the rules of

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The Origins of the Stanley Hoffmann We Knew

Some Comparisons on his Vichy Years with My Family Story

Peter Gourevitch

“Self-Ensnared: Collaboration with Nazi Germany,” 2 and “In the Looking Glass: Sorrow and Pity?” 3 reprinted in a substantial collection of essays 4 that included notable pieces on Charles de Gaulle; contributions to important volumes such as La

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Objects of Dispute

Planning, Discourse, and State Power in Post-War France

Edward Welch

, planning is concerned with anticipating the look, feel, and requirements of a projected future, as Delouvrier’s preoccupation with the Year 2000 as horizon and frontier makes clear. It aims to create urban futures in the present, a desire made manifest in

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You Haven't Seen the Last of Men

The Full Monty (Peter Cattaneo, 1997)

Julie Michot

to satisfy male pleasure: the woman is reduced to an “image”—thus being “passive”—whereas the man is the “bearer of the look”—thus being “active”—according to Laura Mulvey (1989: 19) . Although Mulvey's theses, originally published in 1975, have been