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Anna Wesselink and Jeroen Warner

The aim of this special volume is to critically examine the various ways in which floods and flood management are framed in current policies, especially the “space for rivers” policies that have been adopted in many countries of Western Europe. The articles in this volume discuss different aspects of this framing, while employing different theoretical frames. Of these, Spiral Dynamics stands out as the most intriguing and least known. The papers thereby potentially contribute to reframing policy contents and/or procedures: either because they show alternative policy contents and/or because they show different ways of looking at policy making. This introductory article provides an overview of what framing means in a policy-making context, thereby highlighting the politics of engaging in (re)framing.

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Nina Witoszek

Religion has long stood at the center of debates on the environmental crisis of late modernity. Some have portrayed it as a malade imaginaire, providing divine legitimation for human domination and predatory exploitation of natural resources; others have looked up to it as an inspirational force that is the essential condition of planetary revival. There is an ongoing battle of the books on the salience of religion in the modern world. Some trendy volumes declare that God Is Back (Micklethwait and Wooldridge 2009). Others advert to The End of Faith (Harris 2004, harp the theme of The God Delusion (Dawkins 2006), or claim that God Is Not Great (Hitchens 2007). Both sides provide ample evidence to support their adversarial claims. In much of Canada and Western Europe, where religious establishments have courted or colluded with the state, religion has come to be viewed as the enemy of liberty and modernity. Not so in the United States, where the Jeffersonian separation of religion from politics forced religious leaders to compete for the souls of the faithful—and thus to make Christianity more reconcilable with the agenda of modernity,

individualism and capitalist enterprise.

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Vegetables and Social Relations in Norway and the Netherlands

A Comparative Analysis of Urban Allotment Gardeners

Esther J. Veen and Sebastian Eiter

, gardeners from Dublin and Belfast showed a willingness to disregard social and ethnopolitical categorizations ( Corcoran and Kettle 2015 ). Disadvantaged Gardeners in Well-Off Environments While many gardeners in our Western European context may be

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Separating the Wheat from the Chaff

The Social Worlds of Wheat

Jessica Barnes

as a grain. These companies originated in the nineteenth century as large trading families based in western Europe, who were able to exploit the expanding global trade of wheat ( Morgan 1979 ). There has been remarkable stability among these key

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Attila Tóth, Barbora Duží, Jan Vávra, Ján Supuka, Mária Bihuňová, Denisa Halajová, Stanislav Martinát, and Eva Nováková

less attractive parts on the urban periphery. Spatial development processes, such as suburbanization and urban sprawl common in many cities of Western Europe, suddenly appeared in large postcommunist cities in Central and Eastern Europe with an

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Fostering peace through dialogue

The international social democratic movement and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Pentti Väänänen

The Socialist International (SI), the worldwide forum of the socialist, social democratic, and labor parties, actively looked for a solution to the Jewish-Palestinian conflict in the 1980s. At that time, the Israeli Labour Party still was the leading political force in Israel, as it had been historically since the foundation of the country. The Labour Party was also an active member of the SI. The Party’s leader, Shimon Peres, was one of its vice-presidents. At the same time, the social democratic parties were the leading political force in Western Europe. Several important European leaders, many of them presidents and prime ministers, were involved in the SI’s work. They included personalities such as Willy Brandt of Germany; former president of the SI, Francois Mitterrand of France; James Callaghan of Great Britain; Bruno Kreisky of Austria; Bettini Craxi of Italy; Felipe Gonzalez of Spain; Mario Soares of Portugal; Joop de Uyl of the Netherlands; Olof Palme of Sweden; Kalevi Sorsa of Finland; Anker Jörgensen of Denmark; and Gro Harlem Brudtland of Norway—all of whom are former vice-presidents of the SI. As a result, in the 1980s, the SI in many ways represented Europe in global affairs, despite the existence of the European Community (which did not yet have well-defined common foreign policy objectives).

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Assisted “voluntary” return of women to Kosovo

Rhetoric and reality within the framework of development

Sandra Sacchetti

Serbia). In the 1960s, countries in Western Europe became emigration destinations for guest workers from Kosovo. In addition, the repressive regime of the erstwhile security police chief Aleksandar Ranković (1945–1966) triggered a significant outflow of

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Improving and protecting human rights

A reflection of the quality of education for migrant and marginalized Roma children in Europe

Silvia-Maria Chireac and Anna Devis Arbona

1,200,000 persons emigrated from the East toward Western Europe. Because of their itinerant lifestyle this has been a common source of misunderstanding and discrimination. Traditionally, the permanent mobility of the communities has been met with

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From philanthropy to impact investing

The case of Luxembourg

Shirlita Espinosa

in Western Europe shape the philanthropic and investment potential of Filipino migrants who settled in the country. The strong financial and economic status of Luxembourg provides an example of new migration-related investment opportunities despite

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Naila Maier-Knapp

. Cohesion In this article, cohesion in the context of regions is conceived differently from conventional conceptions that have been mainly developed within Western European policy and scholarly discourses on integration and community. These conventional