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Introduction

Ethnographies of Private Security

Erella Grassiani and Tessa Diphoorn

Security Outsourcing ( Berndtsson and Kinsey 2016 ). This special section builds directly on this extensive scholarly literature on private security, but aims to emphasize insights being produced within anthropology, a discipline that began to focus on the

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Calvin Goldscheider

Orit Abuhav, In the Company of Others: The Development of Anthropology in Israel [in Hebrew] (Tel Aviv: Resling Publishing, 2010), 331 pp.

Esther Hertzog, Orit Abuhav, Harvey E. Goldberg, and Emanuel Marx, eds., Perspectives on Israeli Anthropology (Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 2010), 732 pp.

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“We Had to Pay to Live!”

Competing Sovereignties in Violent Mexico

Wil G. Pansters

This article examines the emergence of self-defense forces (autodefensas) in Michoacán (Mexico) in the context of relationships between drug trafficking and the state, concentrating on the recent history of fragmentation, disorder, and violence. It traces how these processes generated comprehensive criminal sovereignty projects, which then triggered the emergence of armed defense forces in both indigenous and mestizo communities. Recent developments in Michoacán are described in light of anthropological theorizing about the relations between sovereignty, state-making, and (dis)ordering. The analysis elucidates the triangular dynamics of sovereignty-making among organized crime, the state, and armed citizens. Special attention is given to state interventions to dismantle de facto self-defense sovereignties because these have created an unstable and violent situation. It is argued that sovereignty-making is territorial and historical, and that it is embedded in political, economic, and cultural identities.

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Hidden Scripts

The Social Evolution of Alterman's “Don't You Give Them Guns”

Efrat Ben-Ze'ev

Nathan Alterman's poem “Don't You Give Them Guns” echoed European post–World War I anti-war literature. Curiously, the poem turned into a key text in a ritual instituted by members of the elite Jewish underground fighting force, the Palmach, which was established during World War II. This article is an attempt to understand how a pacifist poem came to be used by Jewish-Israeli soldiers at the heart of the 1948 War of Independence. In terms of theory, the analysis dwells on the relations between text and social context, arguing that alternative social ideas conceal themselves in poetry and other literary forms. These texts can be likened to undercurrents that preserve hidden social concerns. To follow the changing role of such texts, the article considers the fate of “Don't You Give Them Guns” from its birth in 1934 to its later manifestations in the early twenty-first century.

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Creative Intelligence and the Cold War

US Military Investments in the Concept of Creativity, 1945–1965

Bregje F. Van Eekelen

anthropological studies of national differences in creativity, such as Ruth Benedict’s (1934) Patterns of Culture , Robert Lowie’s (1931) study on the “inventiveness of the Indian American,” Franz Boas’s (1932) Anthropology and Modern Life , and David

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Antonius C. G. M. Robben

Technological developments in the security field are calling for a new anthropological approach to the study of violence. The anthropology of violence shifted during the late 1980s from an emphasis on the structural and symbolic dynamics of violence

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Introduction

Performance, Power, Exclusion, and Expansion in Anthropological Accounts of Protests

Aet Annist

From Max Gluckmann's (1954) work on rituals of rebellion to more recent work on such protest movements as Occupy ( Graeber 2009 ) or the Arab Spring ( Bayat 2015 ), anthropology has sought to analyze dissent as a process of collision with

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Bernhard Wasserstein

Dr. Likhovski’s book is a formidable achievement that has relevance for the development of Israeli law, for students of comparative legal systems, particularly colonial ones, for the history of Zionist ideology, and for conceptualizers of legal anthropology. I shall focus on only a few aspects of his work from the standpoint of a political historian of Mandatory Palestine.

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Guy Ben-Porat, Between State and Synagogue: The Secularization of Contemporary Israel Review by Netanel Fisher

Hanna Lerner, Making Constitutions in Deeply Divided Societies Review by Mordechai Kremnitzer

David Ohana, Israel and Its Mediterranean Identity Review by Sammy Smooha

Margalit Toledano and David McKie, Public Relations and Nation Building: Influencing Israel Review by Anat First

Myron J. Aronoff and Jan Kubik, Anthropology and Political Science: A Convergent Approach Review by Joel Migdal

Rachel S. Harris and Ranen Omer-Sherman, eds., Narratives of Dissent: War in Contemporary Israeli Arts and Culture Review by Tal Dekel

Yigal Zalmona, A Century of Israeli Art Review by Tal Dekel

Ilana Szobel, A Poetics of Trauma: The Work of Dahlia Ravikovitch Review by Eric Zakim

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Shai Ginsburg, Rhetoric and Nation: The Formation of Hebrew National Culture, 1880–1990 Review by Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi

Anat Helman, Becoming Israeli: National Ideals & Everyday Life in the 1950s Review by Dafna Hirsch

Madelaine Adelman and Miriam Fendius Elman, eds., Jerusalem: Conflict and Cooperation in a Contested City Review by Shlomo Hasson

Adam Rovner, In the Shadow of Zion: Promised Lands Before Israel Review by Michael Brenner

Fran Markowitz, Stephen Sharot, and Moshe Shokeid, eds., Towards an Anthropology of Nation Building and Unbuilding in Israel Review by Russell Stone

Guy Ziv, Why Hawks Become Doves: Shimon Peres and Foreign Policy Change in Israel Review by Oded Haklai

R. Amy Elman, The European Union, Antisemitism, and the Politics of Denial Review by Alona Fisher

Rachel S. Harris, An Ideological Death: Suicide in Israeli Literature Review by Adia Mendelson-Maoz

David Ohana, The Origins of Israeli Mythology: Neither Canaanites Nor Crusaders Review by Ian S. Lustick