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Patrick Colm Hogan

Our emotional responses are determined not only by actual experience, but also by anticipation. Indeed, we respond not only to anticipations per se, but to the relation between anticipations and experiences. Such anticipations operate on different time scales, linked with distinct neurological substrates. Some—such as those involving expectations about the immediate trajectory of objects—are very brief. The relations between experience and very short-term expectations can have significant emotional consequences. One purpose of the standard continuity editing system is to avoid disruptions in our short-term projections. However, the manipulation of discontinuities, thus the controlled disruption of short-term anticipations, can significantly contribute to the emotional impact of film. It is possible to isolate distinct varieties of anticipation and disruption, examining their emotional consequences in different cases. Muzaffar Ali's Umrao Jaan provides a virtual catalogue of such disruptions and their emotional effects.

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Andreas Baranowski and Heiko Hecht

Abstract

One hundred years ago, in 1916, Hugo Münsterberg was the first psychologist to publish a book on movie psychology, entitled The Photoplay: A Psychological Study. We revisit this visionary text, which was an anticipation of the field of cognitive movie psychology. We use the structure of his book to look into advances that have been made within the field and evaluate whether Münsterberg’s initial claims and predictions have borne out. We comment on the empirical development of film studies regarding perceived depth and movement, attention, memory, emotion, and esthetics of the photoplay. We conclude that the most of Münsterberg’s positions remain surprisingly topical one hundred years later.

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Jens Eder

relational, comparable to touch in connecting the felt “inside” of the feeling person with the “outside” of the world. Third, they involve a presupposed space of experiential possibility, that is, anticipations of what kinds of experiences are generally

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The Cine-Fist

Eisenstein’s Attractions, Mirror Neurons, and Contemporary Action Cinema

Maria Belodubrovskaya

and was not thinking in terms of narrative integration does not diminish this fact. In Moving Viewers , Plantinga proposes that “narrative emotions”—such as “anticipation, suspense, and curiosity” elicited by narration—are primary to how we engage

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The Aesthetics of Boredom

Slow Cinema and the Virtues of the Long Take in Once Upon a Time in Anatolia

Emre Çağlayan

, fidgeting continuously between moments of sheer restlessness, boredom, and pronounced anticipation” ( 2004: 284–287 ). Similarly, Patrice Petro finds Warhol’s and Akerman’s films marked by an “an aesthetics of boredom [that] retains the modernist impulse of

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Ted Nannicelli

Neurons, and Contemporary Action Cinema,” Vassilieva probes Eisenstein's influences, connections, and collaborations with his contemporaries working in the sciences of the mind, noting an anticipation of some important contemporary trends in the field

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Toward a Naturalized Aesthetics of Film Music

An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Intramusical and Extramusical Meaning

Timothy Justus

's (2006) Sweet Anticipation , for example, was heavily influenced by schema theory. The lasting appeal of schemata to the psychology of art is this: across a variety of art forms, especially art that unfolds over time, the activation of schematic

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Patrick Keating

easy understanding after a period of exhilarating cognitive challenge. Rather, it is the aesthetic high point of the scene, precisely because we so clearly understand the full complexity of Sadie's response: her anticipation turning to sadness, her

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Anxious Breath

An Autoethnographic Exploration of Non-binary Queerness, Vulnerability, and Recognition in Step Out

Lara Bochmann and Erin Hampson

sense of control and its anticipation in approaching and crossing physical and metaphorical thresholds and the implications this can have for us. Although, while our experience of violence instigated the making of the film and has been an important

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Toward a Model of Distributed Affectivity for Cinematic Ethics

Ethical Experience, Trauma, and History

Philip Martin

-making that draw not only on what actions are immediately available, but also on how these availabilities are presented, their sustained affective impacts, and our anticipations, beliefs, memories, and habits. With respect to art, institution articulates