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Putting the Culture into Bioculturalism

A Naturalized Aesthetics and the Challenge of Modernism

Dominic Topp

evolution. He argues instead for “a biocultural view which rejects the dichotomous views of both emotion and the study of emotion.” According to this model, culture arises “from certain evolved features of the human species” (2017: 156–157), and cultural

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Katherine Thomson-Jones

Kuleshov effect. The chapter concludes with a discussion of affective mimicry, building on earlier chapters and aiming to “thicken” the explanation with the aid of both neuroscientific evidence and evolutionary theory. Chapter 6 provides a “biocultural

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Torben Grodal

This article analyzes the psychological and neurological underpinnings of crime fiction and discusses the interrelation between cultural and biological-evolutionary determinants of fictions of detection. It argues that although crime fiction is a product of modern life conditions, it is also centrally fueled in the minds of viewers and readers by the mammalian dopamine seeking/wanting system developed for seeking out resources by foraging and hunting and important for focused mental and physical goal-directed activities. The article describes the way the working of the seeking system explains how crime fiction activates strong salience (in some respects similar to the effect of dopamine-drugs like cocaine, Ritalin, and amphetamine) and discusses the role of social intelligence in crime fiction. It further contrasts the unempathic classical detector fictions with two subtypes of crime fiction that blend seeking with other emotions: the hardboiled crime fiction that blends detection with action and hot emotions like anger and bonding, and the moral crime fiction that strongly evokes moral disgust and contempt, often in conjunction with detectors that perform hard to fake signals of moral commitment that make them role models for modern work ethics. The article is part of bio-cultural research that describes how biology and culture interact as argued in Grodal's Embodied Visions.

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Naturalizing Aesthetic Experience

The Role of (Liberated) Embodied Simulation

Vittorio Gallese

justice to the many ideas, principles, and strategies that Smith puts forward in an effort to build a naturalized approach to film and the arts. As a supporter and active practitioner of the “third-culture approach” and a follower of the biocultural turn

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“Mind the Gap”

Between Movies and Mind, Affective Neuroscience, and the Philosophy of Film

Jane Stadler

refers to as a naturalized aesthetics of film, which sees cinema as a technocultural product of fundamental human capacities related to perception, cognition, and emotion. Taking a biocultural approach that examines the interrelationship between

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Christopher Blake Evernden, Cynthia A. Freeland, Thomas Schatz, and Frank P. Tomasulo

. Overall, the analysis uses two theoretical frameworks: bioculturalism and Schubart's term evofeminism —a hybrid of the evolutionary nature of bioculturalism married to multiple iterations and discussions of feminism. This last term supports her ongoing

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Film, Art, and the Third Culture

A Naturalized Aesthetics of Film—Précis

Murray Smith

a “biocultural” approach to emotion, one which resists the separation of the biological underpinnings of emotions and their elaboration within cultures into separate silos. What are the grounds for such an approach, and how does it fare with

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Torben Grodal

on the body of a dead villain. Postscript: Biocultural Perspectives Die Hard is clearly created by a mix of biological dispositions and a specific cultural environment as described in biocultural theory (see Grodal 2009 ). The basic architecture of

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Murray Smith

), putting too much weight on “the biological basis of mental capacities” (28), narrowly conceived (a concern shared by Topp, who urges me to put more culture into the “bioculturalism” I advocate). On this view, culture does not merely “fine-tune” or bring to

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Disrupted PECMA Flows

A Cognitive Approach to the Experience of Narrative Complexity in Film

Veerle Ros and Miklós Kiss

subjectivity of individual viewers by acknowledging how culturally acquired frames, scripts, and schemata play a fundamental role in interpretive processes. This neither universalist nor cultural-relativist, but bio-cultural approach ( Boyd 2009 ; Grodal 2007