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Paul-François Tremlett

In the autumn of 2011 and the spring of 2012, the Occupy London protests, informed by the ideal of a moral, territorially defined community, caught the imagination of British and global publics. For a short while, this moral imaginary was mobilized to contest some of the most glaring contradictions of the neo-liberal city. I argue that the Occupy protests in London registered a sense of public outrage at the violation of certain 'sacred' norms associated with what it means to live with others. More concretely, I contend that Occupy London was an experiment initiated to open out questions of community, morality, and politics and to consider how these notions might be put to work. These questions were not merely articulated intellectually among expert interlocutors. They were lived out through the spatially and temporally embodied occupation of urban space.

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Sheikhs and the City

Urban Paths of Contention in Sidon, Lebanon

Are John Knudsen

for the Assir movement was enabled by the urban ecology in Sidon and the internal crises in Lebanon's Sunni political and religious establishment that for a brief period shifted the moral leadership of the Sunnis from the elites in the capital of

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To Be or Not to Be a Hero

Recognition and Citizenship among Disabled Veterans of the Sri Lankan Army

Matti Weisdorf and Birgitte Refslund Sørensen

Based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork in and around a so-called War Hero Village (Ranavirugama) in northwestern Sri Lanka, this article traces the social (un)becomings of Sri Lankan Army veterans injured during the civil war with the Tamil liberation front. It argues that such veterans have long been able to draw on a materially rewarding narrative of sacrifice and carnal capital—epitomized in the honorific ranaviru (war hero)—in order to produce a particular kind of veteran citizenship, let alone subjectivity, and thus to pursue socially meaningful post-injury existences. In the eyes of the veterans themselves, however, this celebratory narrative is eroding and a “collective narrative” characterized by a kind of social forgetting of the injured veteran is emerging. Material benefits notwithstanding, this narrative contestation entails a “struggle for recognition” that threatens to leave them not only disabled but also with no one to be, or become.

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Rwandan Women No More

Female Génocidaires in the Aftermath of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide

Erin Jessee

Since the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the current government has arrested approximately 130,000 civilians who were suspected of criminal responsibility. An estimated 2,000 were women, a cohort that remains rarely researched through an ethnographic lens. This article begins to address this oversight by analyzing ethnographic encounters with 8 confessed or convicted female génocidaires from around Rwanda. These encounters reveal that female génocidaires believe they endure gender-based discrimination for having violated taboos that determine appropriate conduct for Rwandan women. However, only female génocidaires with minimal education, wealth, and social capital referenced this gender-based discrimination to minimize their crimes and assert claims of victimization. Conversely, female elites who helped incite the genocide framed their victimization in terms of political betrayal and victor’s justice. This difference is likely informed by the female elites’ participation in the political processes that made the genocide possible, as well as historical precedence for leniency where female elites are concerned.

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Beyond Economy and Religion

Resources and Socio-cosmic Fields in Odisha, India

Roland Hardenberg

to a group or community as a kind of property. Such an economic perspective is equally relevant for a variety of different spheres of action. The term ‘capital’ as defined by Bourdieu (1986) is a prime example of this kind of metaphoric

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Guarding the Body

Private Security Work in Rio de Janeiro

Erika Robb Larkins

have a “‘natural’ or ‘raw’ talent that needs to be ‘sanitized’ through western training” (2016: 820). In the present case, the guards I studied learned to perform acceptable or sanitized versions of what Loïc Wacquant calls “bodily capital” at the

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feature of the modern world. These translocal and transnational processes involve flows of not just people but also material objects, ideas, information, images and capital.” Once relatively neglected, pilgrimage and other forms of religiously motivated

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Bülent Diken

practices that constitute power. In market exchange, money functions merely as a measure of value. But in the form of capital, it functions as a measure of the value of values. Hence, the power of abstract capital (value producing more value) is not

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Introduction

Narratives, Ontologies, Entanglements, and Iconoclasms

Sondra L. Hausner, Simon Coleman, and Ruy Llera Blanes

yet, creates—epistemology. Finally, we return to grounded ethnographic work in Odisha, India, to consider in Roland Hardenberg’s article the possibility that ‘resources’, like capital, might be a useful way to consider the exigencies of culture, in

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"Our Future Is Already in Jeopardy"

Duress and the Palimpsest of Violence of Two CAR Student Refugees in the DRC

Maria Catherina Wilson Janssens

. 2014 ). 3 The Séléka took over the capital on 24 March 2013. Soon after, differences between the heads of the different groups that constituted the Séléka came to the fore, and the coalition began to disintegrate. Nowadays, the Séléka continues to