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Lissa Weinstein and Banu Seckin

When Craig, an oft-humiliated and unsuccessful street puppeteer, discovers a portal into the body of John Malkovich, he finds that fusion with a live “celebrity puppet” offers a solution to the dilemmas of being human— imperfection, vulnerability, and death. In this fantastical context, the filmmakers raise questions about intention, identity, authorship, and the wisdom of elevating narcissism over Eros. Although a desire to transcend the limitations of the mortal body may be ubiquitous, the unique solution offered in Being John Malkovich is the apparent triumph of this narcissistic fantasy, rather than an acceptance of reality. This article first explores the film's use of the universal imagery of narcissism and then examines how technology, which allows widespread access to a visually oriented media culture, and changes in the meaning of fame have altered the expression of narcissistic fantasies, as well as the anxieties that accompany their fulfillment.

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Hopeful, Harmless, and Heroic

Figuring the Girl Activist as Global Savior

Jessica K. Taft

example of an empowered girl, no different from performers, athletes, or other celebrities. She's Extraordinary: Figuring Girl Activists as Heroes Hopefulness and harmlessness work together to produce the figure of the girl activist as an easily

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Holding Up Half the Sky

Global Narratives of Girls at Risk and Celebrity Philanthropy

Angharad Valdivia

component of celebrity branding and corporate public relations that seek representation of their actions as cosmopolitan morality and global citizenry. Focusing on the Half the Sky ( HTS ) phenomenon that culminated in a documentary by Maro Chermayeff

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Karolina Dmitrow-Devold

Teenage female personal bloggers in Norway occupy the top positions in national blog rankings. This takes girl-bloggers to a place where they have rarely, if ever, been before: a place with massive audiences and media attention that can bring about celebrity status or financial benefits. Operating within a genre of personal blogging that combines accounts of everyday life and topics related to fashion and beauty, they are commonly referred to as pink bloggers. This gendered term is widely used in the media and this article argues that it contributes to a reinforcement of a negative image of teenage female personal bloggers, who are dismissed as trivial, commercial and irresponsible. This article analyzes prevailing discursive representations of the so-called pink bloggers in the mainstream press coverage: popular but insignificant, trendsetting but irresponsible, savvy but vulnerable. The implications of these representations are discussed as well.

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M.I.A. in the Global Youthscape

Rethinking Girls' Resistance and Agency in Postcolonial Contexts

Lisa Weems

In this article I explore the performance art of international hip-hop artist M.I.A. to interrogate the problematic of girls' resistance and agency within a global youthscape. Using a feminist transnational framework, I analyze how her music and celebrity persona may be considered gendered post-colonial cultural productions that highlight issues of inequality, violence and domination. I argue that M.I.A.'s cultural productions serve as pedagogical symbolic resources for theorizing girlhood in post-colonial contexts specifically around issues of sexuality. As a symbolic resource, M.I.A.'s work is pedagogical in the larger global youthscape as well as in scholarship on girls in post-colonial contexts. Specifically, M.I.A. (in her music and interviews) openly wrestles with the embodied tensions between complicity and possibility in post-colonial girlhood. Consistent with a feminist transnational framework, I argue that the identities of “Third World” girls are discursively produced as innocent yet hypersexualized exotic Others in the service and/or mercy of “First World” colonial men and women. However, M.I.A. makes explicit that within the context of globalization, the cultural politics of gender and sexuality take place on/through/with brown female bodies—whether it is in the battlefield, the street or in the bedroom. A close analysis M.I.A.'s song 10 Dollar illustrates how Third World girls exercise resistance and agency in negotiating imperialist and nationalist heteropatriarchy.

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Los Roldán and the Inclusion of Travesti Narratives

Representations of Gender-Nonconforming Identities in Argentinian Telenovelas

Martín Ponti

In 2004, Florencia de la V became the first travesti 1 celebrity to star on a mainstream serial. Her success on Los Roldán (2004–, Telefe) allowed her to have a lucrative career spanning multiple projects, including talk shows and films, and

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Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

. Harris , Anita . 2004 . Future Girl: Young Women in the Twenty-first Century . New York : Routledge . 10.4324/9780203490198 Kennedy , Melanie . 2018 . in press . Tweenhood: Femininity and Celebrity in Tween Popular Culture . London : I

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Reading Production and Culture

UK Teen Girl Comics from 1955 to 1960

Joan Ormrod

. Celebrity star culture was developing rapidly in the late 1950s along with the growth of access to media technologies like television, radio, popular music, and film. The early British pop industry used religious discourses to ensure that the emerging stars

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Contemporary Girls Studies

Reflections on the Inaugural International Girls Studies Association Conference

Victoria Cann, Sarah Godfrey, and Helen Warner

consumer capitalism. Applying her construction of what she calls Anaconda Feminism to the reading of Minaj’s star image, Halliday considers the complicated ways in which black women celebrities negotiate public life. Perhaps the most pressing contribution

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Sarah E. Whitney

encourages spectacle, celebrity, and the gloss of empowerment, reinforces a so-called princess dominance of white middle class femininity ( Forman-Brunell and Hains 2015 ; C. Griffin 2004 ; Harzewski 2011 ; Orenstein 2011 ). When Brianna dusts her blue and