Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 81 items for :

  • Transportation Studies x
  • Mobility Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

“Two Wheels Bad”?

The Status of Cycling in the Youth Hostels Association of England and Wales in the 1930s

Michael Cunningham

movement, Oliver Coburn described the common room thus: “this is the environment in which all classes and types can mingle successfully, the son of an employer with the son of an employee, the labourer and the clerk, the countryman and the townsman, the shy

Restricted access

Anru Lee

Mobility is a key word for understanding gender and class formation. In a recent review of feminism, gender, and mobility, historian Georgine Clarsen reminds us that movement never occurs through neutral physical space; it involves gendered bodies through gendered spaces, by means of transport technologies that are often deeply gendered. Furthermore, gendered meanings, practices, and experiences change greatly over time and location. For all these reasons, mobility is—and has to be—contextualized. This article takes inspiration from Clarsen and investigates recent literature on the issue of gender and everyday mobility in urban Asia across a number of academic disciplines.

Restricted access

Jessica Lockrem

This essay reviews scholarship which has focused on the bodies and embodied experiences of people moving and being moved. Scholars have long been interested in how physical bodies move through space and how actors perceive space during movement. This attention to embodied experience includes phenomenological engagements with the environment, sensorial perceptions during movement, and emotional entanglements with ways of moving through space. The essay then examines studies of transportation that analyze how gender, class, race, and national identity (and the intersections thereof) affect how a person experiences, uses, and ascribes meaning to modes of transportation. The essay demonstrates that just as experience and subjectivity shape transportation choices, so do transportation choices shape experience and subjectivity.

Restricted access

Paul Dietschy

Modern sport was born at the same time as modern mobility. Sport became one of the biggest promotional tools, first through cycle competitions, then car races. First intended for the wealthy, motor sports soon invited the middle classes to enter into a culture of freedom and social advancement which accompanied new forms of mobility. However, the links between sport and mobility are not restricted to motor sport or publicity. Indeed modern sport is a child of modern mobility, and just as the spread of new forms of mobility played a fundamental role in the passage from rural to urban societies, the transport revolution accelerated the decline of the traditional games and made possible the invention of contemporary sport and of global sports culture and space.

Restricted access

Yajun Mo

Overtaking Americans and Germans as the world’s most exuberant tourism spenders, middle-class Chinese tourists have become the most coveted demographic in the global tourism market. At the same time, robust “Golden Week” tourism data, which tracks domestic tourism during the two-week national holidays in mainland China, has indicated a surge in travel within China. Viewed as a revealing lens through which one could observe Chinese modernity, travel and tourism-related activities have attracted considerable attention from scholars interested in China.1 However, marked as a “contemporary” phenomenon, tourism and travel in China seem to have remained largely outside historians’ purview. In response to calls from mobility scholars for a historical understanding of the movement of peoples, goods, and ideas since the late twentieth century, China historians have begun to examine the practice of travel and tourism, especially from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. At the same time, infl uenced by colonial discourse analysis and postcolonial theory, literary scholars have renewed their interests in Chinese travel accounts, both textual and visual, making connections between travelers’ representations and the imaginations of empire and nation-state over the past few centuries.

Restricted access

Lucy Baker, Paola Castañeda, Matthew Dalstrom, Ankur Datta, Tanja Joelsson, Mario Jordi-Sánchez, Jennifer Lynn Kelly, and Dhan Zunino Singh

Justification: Economies of Worth (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006). “A Vehicle for a New City”—What About the Citizens? Considering Cycling, Race, and Class in Shifting Regional Configurations John Stehlin, Cyclescapes of the Unequal

Full access

Walking as a Metaphor

COVID Pandemic and the Politics of Mobility

Avishek Ray

migrate for work, and now the loss of that work forcing them to return “home.” What this pandemic is conversely exposing is the so-called freedom of immobility, playing out across the world in vastly different but predominantly class-based contexts. Those

Restricted access

Anna-Leena Toivanen

as class, gender, and ethnicity. 39 Such a “politics of mobility” 40 also defines aeromobilities and the way in which aeromobilities contribute to “produc[ing] certain identities and inequalities.” 41 The production of identities and inequalities

Restricted access

Deborah Snow Molloy and Robert M. Briwa

of the environment upon the individual, along class, race, and gender lines, makes telling use of the emblem of mobility to engage with her subject matter. With its modernist sensibility and Harlem setting The Street shows the futility so many

Restricted access

Ernst van der Wal

race, ethnicity, class, and nation,” however, one should also be aware of “enduring asymmetries of domination, inequality, racism, sexism, class conflict, and uneven development in which transnational practices are embedded and which they sometimes even