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Andrea Scholz

Museum of Berlin. Within the scope of the project, a joint online platform for collaborative research on objects from the Amazon was developed. Initially, “Sharing Knowledge” was part of the Humboldt Lab Dahlem, an experimental program from 2012 to 2015

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Margareta von Oswald and Verena Rodatus

format of research to do so. Researching Collaboratively We thus initiated a collaborative research project with our colleague Romuald Tchibozo, an art historian at the Université d’Abomey-Calavi in Benin, who from 2013 to 2014 was Fellow of Art Histories

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Marcela Vásquez-León, Brian Burke, and Lucero Radonic

A critical interest of applied anthropology is to educate students to be theoretically grounded and capable of assuming a level of social responsibility that extends beyond academia. In this paper, we reflect on the issue of student preparation for work in the policy arena by focusing on the experiences of a five-year applied research project that examines agricultural cooperatives as situated agents of change and grassroots development. The project has completed three field seasons in Brazil and Paraguay in which student researchers, including anthropology graduate students from the University of Arizona and in-country undergraduate students from partner universities, have been an integral part. The paper focuses on strategies developed in the research process that enhance student learning. Community Based Research, learning to work through research teams, and creating community-university partnerships constitute the bases of a project that emphasises student learning in the process of doing research and forming collaborations.

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Les archives de Marcel Mauss ont-elles une spécificité?

Le cas de la collaboration de Marcel Mauss et Henri Hubert

Jean-François Bert

Les archives de Marcel Mauss, conservées à l’IMEC (Institut Mémoires de l’Edition Contemporaine), reflètent l’éclatement et le dépassement constant d’une pensée originale et curieuse touchant à la sociologie, à l’ethnographie ou encore à l’histoire des religions, mais aussi à la situation économique et politique et aux innovations sociales. On sait moins, en revanche, que ce fonds d’archives est double. Les archives de Marcel Mauss sont aussi celle de Henri Hubert. Un « jumeau de travail » que Mauss rencontra en 1896 à l’École pratique des hautes études et avec qui, par la suite, il produira une oeuvre théorique importante dont « l’Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice » ou « l’Esquisse d’une théorie générale de la magie ». Outre sa richesse documentaire, ce fonds d’archives invite aussi à explorer les processus de la créativité scientifique et, plus particulièrement, la difficile pratique de l’écriture à deux. C’est en tout cas ce que nous proposons de montrer à partir des notes, des correspondances et des manuscrits encore inédits conservés.

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Integrating Research and Collections Management

The Ho‘omaka Hou Research Initiative at the Bishop Museum

Mara A. Mulrooney, Charmaine Wong, Kelley Esh, Scott Belluomini, and Mark D. McCoy

important cultural collections using the best and most appropriate practices possible. Conclusion The Ho‘omaka Hou Research Initiative, a multifaceted collaborative research program, highlights the significance of the Archaeology Collections housed at Bishop

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Introduction

Elusive Matsutake

Lieba Faier

In this special issue, we draw on our collaborative research as the Matsutake Worlds Research Group to explore the world-making dynamics of multispecies encounters. We center our exploration on matsutake, a gourmet mushroom eaten primarily in Japan. Drawing on cases from around the world, we suggest that the cosmopolitan worlds of matsutake cannot be accounted for by any single agent or individual set of cultural or political economic processes. Rather, we propose that contingent multispecies attunements and coordinations knit together the various world-making processes that allow matsutake to flourish. We use the notion of ‘elusiveness’ to capture these shifting dynamics of attraction, coordination, and elusion.

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Bringing Indigenous Kamchatka to Google Earth

Collaborative Digital Mapping with the Itelmen Peoples

Brian Thom, Benedict J. Colombi, and Tatiana Degai

Abstract

Indigenous peoples in the Russian Far East are engaged in vibrant cultural and linguistic resurgence and revitalization through their community and regional organizations. Through the activities of one of these organizations, a computer-aided cultural mapping project was initiated in collaboration with indigenous villages along the Kamchatka Peninsula, working with youth and elders to map out the histories of special cultural places. The project utilized innovative participatory methodologies using Google Earth and related Google mapping tools, which are freely accessible and desired for use in the communities, providing an accessible, low-cost, easy-to-use computer application for detailed digital cultural mapping. This article elaborates on the use of these technologies to empower a community-based collaborative research project and reflects on critical issues in aligning community, corporate, and scholarly objectives in successful projects.

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Susan Brin Hyatt

As a political and economic philosophy, neoliberalism has been used to reshape schools and universities, making them far more responsive to the pressures of the market. The principles associated with neoliberalism have also extended to programmes for urban economic development, particularly with respect to the largescale gentrification of neighbourhoods rendering them amenable to investments aimed at creating spaces attractive to white, middle-and-upper class consumers. In this article, I discuss how universities themselves have come to play a significant role as urban developers and investors, promoting commercial retail development and building upscale housing in neighbourhoods adjacent to their campuses. My entry point into this discussion is through describing an ethnographic methods class I taught in 2003, whereby students carried out collaborative research in the African-American neighbourhood surrounding Temple University's main campus in Philadelphia. As a result of their work, we produced a neighbourhood newspaper that sought to disrupt the commonplace assumptions about 'rescuing' the neighbourhood from what was presented as an inexorable spiral of decline; rather, our work showed that actions taken by the university, itself, had helped to produce the very symptoms of decline that the new development project now purported to remedy.

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Cognitive Disability

Towards an Ethics of Possibility

Faye Ginsburg and Rayna Rapp

disabilities (ID) in Opportunity House: Ethnographic Stories of Mental Retardation (1997). He pioneered creative collaborative research with people with ID, having them author short stories that painted a vivid portrait of their lives as people whose humanity

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Traversing Fields

Affective Continuities across Muslim and Christian Settings in Berlin

Omar Kasmani and Dominik Mattes

–2019). It is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under the framework of the Collaborative Research Center “Affective Societies” at Freie Universität Berlin. Omar Kasmani and Dominik Mattes work closely in collaboration with Hansjörg Dilger, the