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Marcela Vásquez-León, Brian Burke, and Lucero Radonic

A critical interest of applied anthropology is to educate students to be theoretically grounded and capable of assuming a level of social responsibility that extends beyond academia. In this paper, we reflect on the issue of student preparation for work in the policy arena by focusing on the experiences of a five-year applied research project that examines agricultural cooperatives as situated agents of change and grassroots development. The project has completed three field seasons in Brazil and Paraguay in which student researchers, including anthropology graduate students from the University of Arizona and in-country undergraduate students from partner universities, have been an integral part. The paper focuses on strategies developed in the research process that enhance student learning. Community Based Research, learning to work through research teams, and creating community-university partnerships constitute the bases of a project that emphasises student learning in the process of doing research and forming collaborations.

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Les archives de Marcel Mauss ont-elles une spécificité?

Le cas de la collaboration de Marcel Mauss et Henri Hubert

Jean-François Bert

Les archives de Marcel Mauss, conservées à l’IMEC (Institut Mémoires de l’Edition Contemporaine), reflètent l’éclatement et le dépassement constant d’une pensée originale et curieuse touchant à la sociologie, à l’ethnographie ou encore à l’histoire des religions, mais aussi à la situation économique et politique et aux innovations sociales. On sait moins, en revanche, que ce fonds d’archives est double. Les archives de Marcel Mauss sont aussi celle de Henri Hubert. Un « jumeau de travail » que Mauss rencontra en 1896 à l’École pratique des hautes études et avec qui, par la suite, il produira une oeuvre théorique importante dont « l’Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice » ou « l’Esquisse d’une théorie générale de la magie ». Outre sa richesse documentaire, ce fonds d’archives invite aussi à explorer les processus de la créativité scientifique et, plus particulièrement, la difficile pratique de l’écriture à deux. C’est en tout cas ce que nous proposons de montrer à partir des notes, des correspondances et des manuscrits encore inédits conservés.

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Susan Brin Hyatt

As a political and economic philosophy, neoliberalism has been used to reshape schools and universities, making them far more responsive to the pressures of the market. The principles associated with neoliberalism have also extended to programmes for urban economic development, particularly with respect to the largescale gentrification of neighbourhoods rendering them amenable to investments aimed at creating spaces attractive to white, middle-and-upper class consumers. In this article, I discuss how universities themselves have come to play a significant role as urban developers and investors, promoting commercial retail development and building upscale housing in neighbourhoods adjacent to their campuses. My entry point into this discussion is through describing an ethnographic methods class I taught in 2003, whereby students carried out collaborative research in the African-American neighbourhood surrounding Temple University's main campus in Philadelphia. As a result of their work, we produced a neighbourhood newspaper that sought to disrupt the commonplace assumptions about 'rescuing' the neighbourhood from what was presented as an inexorable spiral of decline; rather, our work showed that actions taken by the university, itself, had helped to produce the very symptoms of decline that the new development project now purported to remedy.

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Introduction

Mobility in doctoral education – and beyond

Corina Balaban and Susan Wright

This special issue emerged as a result of Universities in the Knowledge Economy (UNIKE), a four-year collaborative research project and training programme for early-stage researchers that investigated the dynamic relationships between universities and knowledge economies in Europe and in the Asia-Pacific Rim. The project was funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission (EC) and included researchers based at six different universities in five European countries. Mobility was not only a widespread research interest within the UNIKE academic community but also a reality of the project, which was in itself a practical example of mobility in doctoral education, as envisaged by the European Commission. Many questions emerged as to how mobility became so central to the European Union’s policies for higher education, but also as to how the portrayal of mobility on a policy level compared to the actual lived experiences of mobile students and researchers. ‘Mobility’ can refer to many different things: geographical mobility, social mobility, cross-sectoral mobility or intellectual mobility (interdisciplinarity). The academic literature mostly treats them separately, with clusters of studies around each concept. In contrast, this special issue sets out to investigate these different types of mobility collectively, with authors covering several parts or the whole spectrum of mobilities. We believe it is valuable to discuss these four different aspects of mobility together for two reasons. First, they are often mentioned together in higher education policy as ‘desirable’ characteristics of a given education programme. Second, the ideal profile of the new, flexible knowledge worker supposedly combines all these aspects of mobility in one persona. The policy literature produced by influential stakeholders in higher education such as the European Commission and the OECD focuses on how to encourage, foster and support different kinds of mobility, working on the assumption that mobility is inherently good and will benefit countries, higher education systems and individuals. Much of the academic literature has adopted a similar approach, focusing on ways to enable mobility rather than challenge it.

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Beyond Economy and Religion

Resources and Socio-cosmic Fields in Odisha, India

Roland Hardenberg

trap of ‘common sense’ or ‘bourgeois logic’, as it was called by Sahlins in the 1970s? In Tübingen, the Collaborative Research Center (SFB 1070 ResourceCultures) is trying to answer this question in order to develop a concept of resources applicable for

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Meshworks and the Making of Climate Places in the European Alps

A Framework for Ethnographic Research on the Perceptions of Climate Change

Sophie Elixhauser, Stefan Böschen, and Katrin Vogel

based on participant observation, may be fostered by the use of collaborative research methods. 10 Producing a sequence of meshworks, moreover, can show the temporal changes taking place, and the interwoven lines of a meshwork—lines of varying form

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Liliana L. Jubilut

Refugee and Migration Studies: Lessons from Collaborative Research on Sanctuary in the Changing Times of Trump .” Migration and Society 1 : 164 – 174 . 10.3167/arms.2018.010115

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Sarah B. Rodriguez

how the principles play out in research by considering the importance and meanings of community engagement, collaborative research, sustainable research, working within existing health care structures, benefits to the community regarding the research

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Karen Hébert, Joshua Mullenite, Alka Sabharwal, David Kneas, Irena Leisbet Ceridwen Connon, Peter van Dommelen, Cameron Hu, Brittney Hammons, and Natasha Zaretsky

teeth into fewer, more meaty servings. But Tsing’s account deliberately troubles such expectations. After all, its final chapter is an “Anti-Ending,” followed by a subsequent reflection on the collaborative research through which the book was born. Given

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Documenting Sea Change

Ocean Data Technologies, Sciences, and Governance

Kathleen M. Sullivan

their machines, many of whom (the people) inhabit very different subject positions as they engage in collaborative research. Helmreich (2007 , 2009) foregrounds ontological politics anchored not in sighted observations but in sounds as a way to