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A Clash of Civilizations?

Pegida and the Rise of Cultural Nationalism

David N. Coury

far-right who see the influx of Muslims as a threat to Western cultural values, which, to this way of thinking, are rooted more in religion than in the tolerance advocated by the Western Enlightenment. In a 2007 speech to a conference of European

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Ariela Zycherman

ABSTRACT

The expansion and intensification of agriculture is a major driver of deforestation in tropical forests and for global climate change. However, over the past decade Brazil has significantly reduced its deforestation rates while simultaneously increasing its agricultural production, particularly cattle and soy. While, the scholarly literature primarily attributes this success to environmental policy and global economic trends, recent ethnographic depictions of cattle ranchers and soy farmers offer deeper insight into how these political and economic processes are experienced on the ground. Examples demonstrate that policy and markets provide a framework for soy farming and ranching, but emerging forms of identity and new cultural values shape their practices. This article argues that to understand the full picture of why Brazil’s deforestation rates have dropped while the agricultural industry has flourished, the culture of producers must be present in the analysis.

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Sabine Hofmeister

This article is based on the thesis that wilderness as a cultural value emerges where it has been lost as a geographical and material phenomenon. In Europe the idea of wilderness experienced a surprising upswing at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century, with wilderness tours, wilderness education, and self-experience trips into “wilderness” becoming widely established. Also, protection of “wilderness areas” which refers to such different phenomena as large forests, wild gardens, and urban wild is very much in demand. Against this background, the article looks into the material-ecological and symbolic-cultural senses of “wilderness” in the context of changing social relations to nature. Three forms of wilderness are distinguished. Adopting a socio-ecological perspective, the article builds on contemporary risk discourse.

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Poverty and Shame

Interactional Impacts on Claimants of Chinese Dibao

Jian Chen and Lichao Yang

is no sense of shame attached to this situation. The discretion used in rural areas has some characteristics in common. First, when cultural values conflict with policy, most of the time, frontline staff prefer to respect cultural values. For example

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Introduction

Writing History and the Social Sciences with Ivan Jablonka

Nathan Bracher

produced them. By enabling the reader to see his or her epistemological assumptions and cultural values at work in the analysis, the narrator creates a more transparent and more honest text. At the same time, revealing the connections between one’s own life

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Whitewashing History

Pinker’s (Mis)Representation of the Enlightenment and Violence

Philip Dwyer

shifting of cultural values: crowds had become indifferent to the spectacle of violence; put another way, violence in “progressive” societies no longer resulted in the required pedagogical outcome. This is not to say that crowds had lost interest in visible

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Nicholas L. Syrett

involved. While the animus directed at their paying patrons is surely familiar to us today, that so little concern was expressed about those they paid indicates that Italians at midcentury were living under a different set of cultural values from our own

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Phil Tattersall

of the inquiry was the discovery that the proponents had not adequately addressed significant environmental issues such as soil stability, water quality and yield, cultural values, and tourism amenity. Once again, logging in a fragile catchment area

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Humans, Plants, and Networks

A Critical Review

Laura Calvet-Mir and Matthieu Salpeteur

play a role in structuring plant circulation networks, conferring prestige to the biggest givers (high outdegree) and reinforces hierarchy. Influence of the farmer’s social status is important for plants to which high cultural value is ascribed, and

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Amy Binning

boat. That the philosophy and religion and cultural values that would lead to these kind of outputs … something was wrong, something was deeply flawed. So that led to an exploration, starting into Asian philosophies. (Interview, 25 August 2016) Ray