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Editorial

Reinventing Anthropological Topics

Soheila Shahshahani

, perspective and power relations. The author, in the crucible of experience, asks seminal questions on an area that has suffered greatly, not only as human life is concerned, but also in regard to political deceptions and a lack of scientific attention paid to

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Donner la mort au gibier sur le territoire sacré de la Mecque

Une vieille controverse (VIIe-VIIIe siècles)

Hocine Benkheira

sacralisation, est défendu. Muhammad (m. 632) Quand un homme offre un onagre ( ḥimâr wahsh ) qu’il vient de tuer au Prophète, celui-ci décline le cadeau. Constatant la déception sur le visage de l’homme, il lui dit: « Je n’ai rien contre toi, mais je suis en

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Erika Friedl

subverted the ideology of fraternal harmony in the patrilineal ideology that their elders espoused as a virtue. Young children quickly learned that deception, dissimulation, threats and lies greatly helped to get what one needed or wanted, although these

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Seized in Beirut

The Plundered Archives of the Palestinian Cinema Institution and Cultural Arts Section

Rona Sela

imposed by the colonizer, one must stop taking the colonizer into account, as a model or as an antithesis, cease the struggle against him, and break free from ‘the colonizer’s deception’ that creates one’s situation also in times of revolt (1967: 137

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“My Visa Application Was Denied, I Decided to Go Anyway”

Interpreting, Experiencing, and Contesting Visa Policies and the (Im)mobility Regime in Algeria

Farida Souiah

This article explores the ways people targeted by restrictive migration and mobility policies in Algeria experience, interpret, and contest them. It focuses on the perspective of harragas, literally “those who burn” the borders. In the Maghrebi dialects, this is notably how people leaving without documentation are referred to. It reflects the fact that they do not respect the mandatory steps for legal departure. Also, they figuratively “burn” their papers to avoid deportation once in Europe. Drawing on qualitative fieldwork, this article outlines the complex and ambiguous attitudes toward the legal mobility regime of those it aims to exclude: compliance, deception, delegitimization, and defiance. It contributes to debates about human experiences of borders and inequality in mobility regimes. It helps deepen knowledge on why restrictive migration and mobility policies fail and are often counterproductive, encouraging the undocumented migration they were meant to deter.

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Hospitality

A Timeless Measure of Who We Are?

Elena Isayev

Athenians resisted in Euripides’ Children of Heracles (l.257–258). Athens is praised for its refusal to give in to deception, by luring the children away from the protective sanctuary of Zeus, at the suggestion of the Argives, who wanted the suppliants