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Decolonizing “La Brousse

Rural Medicine and Colonial Authority in Cameroon

Sarah C. Runcie

and rural health in Cameroon as a window into the global politics of decolonization in Africa. French government officials and doctors in Cameroon saw the enthusiasm of the Cameroonian government for WHO proposals and the development of the medical

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Introduction

Globalizing the History of French Decolonization

Jessica Lynne Pearson

studying the history of France and its empire, this special issue encourages scholars of French decolonization—or decolonizations, plural—to draw inspiration from the recent transnational and global turns as a way of facilitating a deeper engagement with

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Margareta von Oswald and Verena Rodatus

The decolonization of research won’t be possible without the decolonization of minds. … I think that we [as a research team] took a step in the right direction, but one can’t say that this will continue or become regular. It’s only going to be

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Decolonization and Restitution: Moving Towards a More Holistic and Relational Approach

Report on the Panel on Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous People, ICOM Kyoto, September 2019

Michèle Rivet

At the twenty-fifth triennial ICOM International General Conference, which took place in Kyoto, Japan, on 1 to 7 September 2019, decolonization and restitution were discussed during a whole afternoon under the heading “Decolonization and

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Giuliana Chamedes and Elizabeth A. Foster

Scholarly attention to decolonization in the French Empire and beyond has largely focused on the political transitions from colonies to nation-states. This introduction, and the essays in this special issue, present new ways of looking at decolonization by examining how religious communities and institutions imagined and experienced the end of French Empire. This approach adds valuable perspectives obscured by historiographical emphasis on French republican secularism and on the workings of the colonial state. Bringing together histories of religion and decolonization sheds new light on the late colonial period and the early successor states of the French empire. It also points to the importance of international institutions and transnational religious communities in the transitions at the end of empire.

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A Bridge Across the Mediterranean

Nafissa Sid Cara and the Politics of Emancipation during the Algerian War

Elise Franklin

Algerian nationalists’ argument for independence. 41 The French colonial government therefore felt compelled to offer Algerian women the same rights as their newly decolonized neighbors. The 1956 Tunisian reforms to the status of Muslim women, known as the

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The “Eurasian Question”

Solved by Migration?

Liesbeth Rosen Jacobson

This article examines the arrangements that authorities put in place for populations of mixed ancestry from two former colonies in Asia—the Dutch East Indies and British India—and compares them with those of French Indochina during decolonization. These people of mixed ancestry, or “Eurasians,” as they were commonly called at the time, were a heterogeneous group. Some could pass themselves off as Europeans, while others were seen as indigenous people. The arrangements were negotiated during round table conferences, at which decolonization in all three colonies was prepared. Which agreements were made, what consequences did they have, and how and why did these differ across the three colonial contexts? To answer these questions, I use material from governmental archives from all three former colonial contexts. The article shows that information on the paternal ancestry of Eurasians was decisive in the allocation of European citizenship and admission to the colonizing country.

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By Sentiment and By Status

Remembering and Forgetting Crémieux during the Franco-Algerian War

Jessica Hammerman

citizens who practiced Judaism. Within a few weeks’ time in spring of 1962, the French state orchestrated to “reject the Muslims” from the decolonized French Republic, even as they accepted Jews and pieds noirs . 7 In the move toward decolonization

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Think Global, Fight Local

Recontextualizing the French Army in Algeria, 1954–1962

Terrence G. Peterson

confront decolonization as a specifically global process and why those efforts in turn resonated internationally. As they honed their operational doctrines in Algeria, French military thinkers looked abroad not only to understand the war in Algeria, but

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The French Empire Goes to San Francisco

The Founding of the United Nations and the Limits of Colonial Reform

Jessica Lynne Pearson

would map onto new international institutions and vice versa. 8 Whereas the British were reasonably hopeful about the prospect of using the UN to forestall decolonization, their French counterparts were substantially less confident. Torn between their