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The “Eurasian Question”

Solved by Migration?

Liesbeth Rosen Jacobson

This article examines the arrangements that authorities put in place for populations of mixed ancestry from two former colonies in Asia—the Dutch East Indies and British India—and compares them with those of French Indochina during decolonization. These people of mixed ancestry, or “Eurasians,” as they were commonly called at the time, were a heterogeneous group. Some could pass themselves off as Europeans, while others were seen as indigenous people. The arrangements were negotiated during round table conferences, at which decolonization in all three colonies was prepared. Which agreements were made, what consequences did they have, and how and why did these differ across the three colonial contexts? To answer these questions, I use material from governmental archives from all three former colonial contexts. The article shows that information on the paternal ancestry of Eurasians was decisive in the allocation of European citizenship and admission to the colonizing country.

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Sue Frohlick, Kristin Lozanski, Amy Speier, and Mimi Sheller

What mobilizes people to take up reproductive options, directions, and trajectories in ways that generate the possibilities and practices of mobilities? People’s desires for procreation or to resolve fertility challenges or partake in sperm donation, egg freezing, or surrogacy; the need for abortion services; and forced evacuation for childbirth care all involve movement. Reproductive aspirations, norms, and regulations move people’s bodies, as well as related technologies and bioproducts. At the same time, these corporeal, material, in/tangible mobilities of bodies, things, and ideas are also generative of reproductive imaginaries and practices. Reproduction is mobile and movement affects reproduction. Building from an interdisciplinary workshop on reproductive mobilities in Kelowna, Canada, this article aims to push the mobilities framework toward the edges of feminist, affect, queer, decolonizing, materialist, and nonrepresentational theories in thinking through both reproduction and movement.

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Decolonial Approaches to Refugee Migration

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab in Conversation

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab

to be decolonized. What we mean by decolonizing that field in particular is that, rather than just describing people's lives, we need to shift the attention to something else. Nof Yes, we need to look at the experiences of different refugees from an

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Rihab Azar

the above-mentioned Beyond Borders Scotland, we are effectively talking to people who have already “listened” or at least “made the choice to listen.” But what about the others? How do we engage them? While I agree with Western that decolonization is

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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Juliano Fiori

oppression. The idea of “decolonizing the curriculum” is, of course, à la mode ( Sabaratnam 2017 ; Vanyoro 2019 ). It is difficult to dispute the pedagogical necessity to question epistemic hierarchies and create portals into multiple worlds of knowledge

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Introduction

Recentering the South in Studies of Migration

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

” of and about migration ( Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Daley 2018: 22 ; see Achiume 2019 ; Grosfoguel et al. 2015 , 2016 ; Pailey 2019 ; Vanyoro 2019 ). 1 However, it is less clear whether the “epistemic decolonization of migration theory” ( Grosfoguel

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Ocean, Motion, Emotion

Mobilities and Mobilizations in the Pacific

Matt Matsuda

during the Cold War for nuclear weapons testing. In the decolonizing Pacific, independence in the 1970s brought self-government but also separation and claims for autonomy between different island groups. Marine products remained the principal exports

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Johannes Görbert, Russ Pottle, Jeff Morrison, Pramod K. Nayar, Dirk Göttsche, Lacy Marschalk, Dorit Müller, Angela Fowler, Rebecca Mills, and Kevin Mitchell Mercer

-language representations of Africa and Africans from the run-up to Germany’s imperial expansion to the age of decolonization after World War II. The volume includes twelve case studies on themes that range from the Christian missions through the treatment of African

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Laborers, Migrants, Refugees

Managing Belonging, Bodies, and Mobility in (Post)Colonial Kenya and Tanzania

Hanno Brankamp and Patricia Daley

, and remained an “incomplete legal project” (Brennan 2012: 22) whose exclusionary effects were felt most severely by refugees and asylum seekers. Political uncertainty in the wake of decolonization caused renewed concern among “Western” observers and

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Julien Brachet, Victoria L. Klinkert, Cory Rodgers, Robtel Neajai Pailey, Elieth Eyebiyi, Rachel Benchekroun, Grzegorz Micek, Natasha N. Iskander, Aydan Greatrick, Alexandra Bousiou, and Anne White

considering migration as a normal and complex phenomenon by conceiving of it in terms of human mobility and family transformations. He achieves that by renewing the way to study this subject. This intellectual decolonization work shows the family's centrality