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The “Eurasian Question”

Solved by Migration?

Liesbeth Rosen Jacobson

This article examines the arrangements that authorities put in place for populations of mixed ancestry from two former colonies in Asia—the Dutch East Indies and British India—and compares them with those of French Indochina during decolonization. These people of mixed ancestry, or “Eurasians,” as they were commonly called at the time, were a heterogeneous group. Some could pass themselves off as Europeans, while others were seen as indigenous people. The arrangements were negotiated during round table conferences, at which decolonization in all three colonies was prepared. Which agreements were made, what consequences did they have, and how and why did these differ across the three colonial contexts? To answer these questions, I use material from governmental archives from all three former colonial contexts. The article shows that information on the paternal ancestry of Eurasians was decisive in the allocation of European citizenship and admission to the colonizing country.

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Decolonial Approaches to Refugee Migration

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab in Conversation

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab

 …  Intersectionality and Decolonial Perspectives Nour One of the main things we need to consider when thinking about studies of migration and displacement is that, as a field, it needs to be decolonized. What we mean by decolonizing that field in particular

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Rihab Azar

with Western that decolonization is strongly associated with “listening” (as in: engagement), sound and history do not necessarily challenge long-established colonialist views. Since “anthropological representations are not neutral, but embedded in

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Sanctuary City Organizing in Canada

From Hospitality to Solidarity

David Moffette and Jennifer Ridgley

decolonization raise important questions about who, exactly, is positioned to offer hospitality to migrants, and who should be determining the conditions of membership ( Fortier 2013 ; Walia 2012 , 2013 ). Many activists involved in this work have learned from

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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Juliano Fiori

oppression. The idea of “decolonizing the curriculum” is, of course, à la mode ( Sabaratnam 2017 ; Vanyoro 2019 ). It is difficult to dispute the pedagogical necessity to question epistemic hierarchies and create portals into multiple worlds of knowledge

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Introduction

Recentering the South in Studies of Migration

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

knowledge” of and about migration ( Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Daley 2018: 22 ; see Achiume 2019 ; Grosfoguel et al. 2015 , 2016 ; Pailey 2019 ; Vanyoro 2019 ). 1 However, it is less clear whether the “epistemic decolonization of migration theory

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Refugee Hospitality Encounters in Northern Portugal

“Cultural Orientations” and “Contextual Protection”

Elizabeth Challinor

arrival of more than half a million residents from Portugal’s African colonies—in the wake of Portugal’s 25 April revolution in 1974 which precipitated their decolonization—constitutes a significant historical antecedent to Portuguese refugee hospitality

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Laborers, Migrants, Refugees

Managing Belonging, Bodies, and Mobility in (Post)Colonial Kenya and Tanzania

Hanno Brankamp and Patricia Daley

the wake of decolonization caused renewed concern among “Western” observers and their African allies, who feared the possibility of dissidents forming alliances with communist groups. This inconvenient reality shaped attitudes toward African refugees

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“Windrush Generation” and “Hostile Environment”

Symbols and Lived Experiences in Caribbean Migration to the UK

Huon Wardle and Laura Obermuller

decolonization. Notably, the use of a metaphor usually preserved for bacteria control 4 gives it a contemporary technocratic feel, subtly adapting the more blatant symbolism of immigration as a disease. When it became known that many long-standing British

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Julien Brachet, Victoria L. Klinkert, Cory Rodgers, Robtel Neajai Pailey, Elieth Eyebiyi, Rachel Benchekroun, Grzegorz Micek, Natasha N. Iskander, Aydan Greatrick, Alexandra Bousiou, and Anne White

human mobility and family transformations. He achieves that by renewing the way to study this subject. This intellectual decolonization work shows the family's centrality in migration. There are no migrants as objects or subjects, but human beings caught